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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Baseline reproductive health KAP survey for women final report. target area : Chhlong Operational District, Kratie province

    Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) survey was conducted in Chhlong Operational District of Kratie province, Cambodia to find out KAP of women of reproductive age (15-45) with regard to reproduction and pregnancy, contraceptive knowledge and use, fertility preferences, STDs and AIDS, and abortion. Information from the survey served as a baseline for the Northeast Cambodia Reproductive Health Program.

  2. Working-age adult mortality and primary school attendance in rural Kenya

    The rapid increase in adult mortality due to the AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa raises great concern about potential intergenerational effects on children. This article estimates the impact of AIDS-related adult mortality on primary school attendance in rural Kenya using a panel of 1,266 households surveyed in 1997, 2000, and 2002. The paper distinguishes between effects on boys' and girls' education to understand potential gender differences resulting from adult mortality. We also estimate how adult mortality affects child schooling before as well as after the death occurs. …

  3. Who cares? AIDS Review 2001

    "Who cares?" looks at the levels of HIV/AIDS commitment and care - in the international community, in Africa and inSouth Africa. It askes the question "Who cares?" both in the sense of how we should think about care and commitment, and whether - beyond the rhetoric - we care at all."Who cares?" is largely a reflective document - one that will stir discussion, challenge and response.

  4. To the edge: AIDS Review 2000

    This publication tries to answer the complex question as to why, despite the Comprehensive National AIDS Plan adopted in 1994, South Africa has what has been described as the fastest growing HIV epidemic in the world. It tries to discover what forces shaped the response to the epidemic and how these have operated over time. It has woven together the many threads of the AIDS world that will be familiar to most South Africans, but have, for the first time subjected them to an integrated and critical analysis.

  5. The social and economic impact of HIV/AIDS on families with adolescents and children in Cambodia

    Cambodia is among the countries most severely affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Asia. In 2003, an estimated 123,100 adults in Cambodia were living with HIV/AIDS and 60,000 children were affected by HIV/AIDS. In responding to the epidemic, donors, policymakers, and program planners have had little country-specific information regarding the impact of HIV/AIDS and the effectiveness of interventions, impeding their ability to make decisions regarding resource allocation and program design. …

  6. The impact of AIDS

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic is one of the major development challenges facing the developing countries today. HIV/AIDS is directly threatening the achievement of the eight Millennium Development Goals set by the international community in September 2000. …

  7. The effect of HIV/AIDS on educational attainment

    Using data from Demographic and Health Surveys for eleven countries in sub-Saharan Africa,the authorestimates the effect of local HIV prevalence on individual human capital investment. The authorfinds that the HIV/AIDS epidemic has reduced human capital investment: living in an area with higher HIV prevalence is associated with lower levels of completed schooling and slower progress through school. These results are consistent with a model of human capital investment in which parents and children respond to changes in the expected return to schooling driven by mortality risk.

  8. The Socio-economic Impact of HIV/AIDS on Children in a Low Prevalence Context: the case of Senegal

    This chapter analyses the socio-economic impacts of HIV/AIDS on children in Senegal as well as the response policies implemented by the differnt actors. Data were collected at seven research sites across the country and complemented by a review of available reports and articles. Their analysis reveals an insignificant nationwide impact of HIV/AIDS in sectors of health, education, demography and economy.

  9. The social demand for schooling in HIV/AIDS affected populations in Tanzania: summary results from a field survey

    This paper justifies and explores the results of a social demand survey for primary school enrolment in Tanzania. This records and analyses the evidence derived from a structured household-based survey in rural and urban school catchments in two regions of the country (Iringa and Dodoma) with children and their guardians which explores the social demand for primary schooling, especially in relation to household poverty indices and changing labour in households affected by prolonged illness and death. …

  10. The Impact of a Growing HIV/AIDS Epidemic on the Kenyan Children

    This document gives an overview of the impact of HIV/AIDS on children in Kenya as well as looking at HIV/AIDS interventions. The results presented in this chapter are based on secondary data from relevant institutions, three mini surveys and simulation models. The analysis shows that prevention programmes implemented so far have not been very effective in changing risky behaviours. Data from ministries suggest a slight decline in the quantity of education services and that health services are being overwhelmed by HIV/AIDS patients.

  11. The Effect of Orphanhood on Primary School Attendance Reconsidered: the power of female-headed households in Tanzania. Project Results Workshop, University of Dar es Salaam, 10-12 March, 2003

    The common presumption that orphans are less likely to attend school than non-orphans is re-examined using survey data from two regions in Tanzania. It is argued that orphans should not be compared simply with non-orphans since there are other vulnerable groups of children. Further, with particular reference to place of residence, it is argued that orphans should not be viewed as a homogeneous group. …

  12. Reaching the Poor: The 'cost' of sending children to school: a six country comparative study

    This comparative research study focuses on the main barriers to education for the poorest households in Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Kenya, Uganda and Zambia. Although the study set out primarily to look at the burden of education costs on the poorest households very rich data on other barriers to education (e.g. physical access, quality of education, vulnerability, poverty, and health) have been gathered and are discussed. The study looks at what motivates parents to send their children to school (and keep them there) through their perceptions of the quality and value of education. …

  13. Quantifying effects of illness and death on education at school level: implications for HIV/AIDS responses

    The purpose of this project was to quantify and understand impacts of HIV/AIDS on education, many of which will be carried by poor households and communities, and provide information to feed into multi-sectoral strategy to mitigate negative impacts. Schools and school communities are critical points of intervention in South Africa.

  14. Predicting the social consequences of orphanhood in South Africa

    This paper examines and questions the predictions found in the academic and policy literature of social breakdown in Southern Africa in the wake of anticipated high rates of orphanhood caused by the AIDS epidemic. Analysis of the logic underlying these predictions reveals four causal relationships necessary to fulfil such dramatic and apocalyptic predictions:1. High AIDS mortality rates will produce high numbers of orphans.2. These orphans will become children who do not live in appropriate social environments to equip them for adult citizenship.3. …

  15. Orphanhood and schooling in South Africa: trends in the vulnerability of orphans between 1993 and 2005

    Using eleven nationally representative surveys conducted between 1993 and 2005 this paper assesses the extent to which the vulnerability of orphans to poorer educational outcomes has changed over time as the AIDS crisis deepens in South Africa. This paper seeks to establish whether the fear that extended families are no longer effective safety nets may be overstated or whether traditional coping strategies are indeed breaking down. Patterns of care giving for orphans do appear to be shifting over time but these changes are taking place within the extended family safety net. …

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