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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. The revised international technical guidance on sexuality education - a powerful tool at an important crossroads for sexuality education

    In January 2018, UNESCO, together with UNAIDS, UNFPA, UNICEF, UN Women, and the WHO, completed the substantial technical and political process of updating the International Technical Guidance on Sexuality Education, thereby unifying a UN position on rationale, evidence, and guidance on designing and delivering comprehensive sexuality education (CSE).

  2. Global partnership for action to eliminate all forms of HIV-related stigma and discrimination

    Without addressing HIV-related stigma and discrimination, the world will not achieve the goal of ending AIDS as a public health threat by 2030. The global partnership’s goal is to reach zero HIV-related stigma and discrimination. An opportunity to harness the combined power of governments, civil society and the United Nations, the global partnership will work together, using the unique skills of each constituency, to consign HIV-related stigma and discrimination to history.

  3. Integrating gender and rights into sexuality education: field reports on using It's All One

    International policy agreements, along with emerging evidence about factors influencing programme effectiveness, have led to calls for a shift in sexuality education toward an approach that places gender norms and human rights at its heart. Little documentation exists, however, about the degree to which this shift is actually taking place on the ground or what it entails. Field experiences in using new curriculum tools, such as It's All One, offer one lens onto these questions. To gain a sense of practitioners' experience with this tool, a two-part exercise was conducted. …

  4. HIV and sexual and reproductive health and rights: visions, voices, and priorities of young people living with and most affected by HIV

    The Link Up project, launched by a consortium of global and national partners in early 2013, is an ambitious three-year initiative that seeks to advance the SRHR of more than one million young people in five countries. Link Up distinctively works with young people most affected by HIV aged 10 to 24 years old, with a specific focus on young men who have sex with men, young people who do sex work, young people who use drugs, young transgender people, and young women and men living with HIV. …

  5. Our time to be heard: stories giving voice to young people and their experience of HIV

    This publication is a collection of stories about young people living with HIV written by citizen journalists from the Key Correspondents network. The authors hope that they bring the experiences, thoughts and reflections of young people to the growing global debates on adolescent health and HIV. Key Correspondents is a network of citizen journalists around the world writing on HIV, health and human rights, helping get the voices of those most affected into global debates.

  6. Preventing child marriage in the Commonwealth: the role of education

    Preventing Child Marriage in the Commonwealth: the Role of Education is the latest in a series of reports written by the Royal Commonwealth Society and Plan UK as part of our collaboration to end child, early and forced marriage in the Commonwealth. This report draws on the substantial body of evidence linking improved education to a reduced prevalence of child marriage and seeks to answer the question: what can Commonwealth education stakeholders do to ensure that girls are able to access a safe, high quality education? …

  7. Kigali Declaration: Moving from aspiration to action to prevent and eliminate child, early and forced marriage in the Commonwealth

    This document is the Commonwealth Charter adopted by National Human Rights Institutions and members of the Commonwealth Forum of National Human Rights Institutions (CFNHRI) attending a working session on the imperative to prevent and eliminate child, early and forced marriage, on 5-6 May 2015 in Kigali, Rwanda.

  8. Women living with HIV speak out against violence: A collection of essays and reflections of women living with and affected by HIV

    Violence against women and girls is an unacceptable violation of basic human rights. It also is so widespread that ending it must be a global public health priority. An estimated one in three women is beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused by an intimate partner during her lifetime. Intimate partner violence has been shown to increase the risk of HIV infection by around 50%, and violence (and the fear of violence) deters women and girls from seeking services for HIV prevention, treatment, care and support.

  9. Love, sexual rights and young people: Learning from our peer educators how to be a youth-centred organisation

    This report examines the findings of an external assessment of the A+ programme, an innovative IPPF youth-led programme funded by Danida. The A+ programme was implemented by IPPF’s Member Associations in 16 countries across Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Central America. Its overriding goal was to increase access to sexual and reproductive health services and comprehensive sexuality education for young people, and to promote their sexual and reproductive health and rights. …

  10. Effective laws to end HIV and AIDS: Next steps for parliaments

    With the global AIDS response becoming increasingly hampered by the criminalization of key populations, this study aims to encourage and assist parliamentary scrutiny of legislation that impedes effective HIV interventions. It highlights the various processes in selected parliaments that led to the adoption of laws with a positive impact on the AIDS response. Although such outcomes were not always easy to achieve, they were mainly the result of inspired leadership by parliamentarians able to overcome the moral obstacles that had stifled socially sensitive issues in political debate.

  11. The global HIV epidemics among sex workers

    Since the beginning of the epidemic sex workers have experienced a heightened burden of HIV across settings, despite their higher levels of HIV protective behaviors (UNAIDS, 2009). By gaining a deeper understanding of the epidemiologic and broader policy and social context within which sex work is set one begins to quickly gain a sense of the complex backdrop for increased risk to HIV among sex workers. …

  12. Marrying Too Young: End Child Marriage

    This report is a call to decision makers, parents, communities and to the world to end child marriage. It documents the current scope, prevalence and inequities associated with child marriage. This document argues that child marriage jeopardizes girls’ rights and stands in the way of girls living educated, healthy and productive lives. Furthemore, early marriage also excludes girls from fundamental decisions, such as the timing of marriage and choice of spouse. Not to mention that all of the effects of early marriage put girls more at risk of contracting HIV and other STIs. …

  13. Programs to address child marriage: Framing the problem

    Child marriage violates girls’ human rights and adversely affects their health and well-being. While age at marriage is increasing in most regions of the developing world, early marriage persists for large populations. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than one out of three women aged 20–24 were married before age 18, and one out of seven were married before age 15. There is great variation in child marriage practices across and within regions and between ethnic and religious groups. Eradicating child marriage has long been on the agenda of the United Nations and of individual countries. …

  14. Breaking vows: early and forced marriage and girls' education

    One in every three girls in the developing world is married by the age of 18. One in seven marries before they reach the age of 15. In countries like Niger, Chad, Mali, Bangladesh, Guinea and the Central African Republic (CAR), the rate of early and forced marriage is 60 per cent and over. It is particularly high in South Asia (46 per cent) and in sub-Saharan Africa (38 per cent). …

  15. Advancing Sexuality Education in Developing Countries: Evidence and Implications

    Educators, researchers, policymakers and parents alike have become increasingly interested in the potential for sexuality education to help meet the needs of young people. The quality and quantity of evaluation research in this field has improved dramatically over the last decade, and there is now clear evidence that sexuality education programs can help young people to delay sexual activity and improve their contraceptive use when they begin to have sex. …

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