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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Young people's perspectives on the adoption of preventive measures for HIV/AIDS, malaria and family planning in South-West Uganda: focus group study

    The aim of the study was to explore young people's understanding and knowledge about why protective measures against HIV/AIDS, malaria and unplanned pregnancy are not taken by those at risk in Uganda. The study results were that the participants (all from secondary school in Kanungu Uganda) could identify reasons why preventive action was not taken. These reasons included misconceptions, the inpracticability of abstinence, and fear of side effects of several key interventions. The article argues that there is an apportunity to improve preventive measures by tackling these issues. …

  2. Community-based HIV/AIDS education in rural Uganda: which channel is most effective?

    This analysis looks at aáprocess evaluation of four channels of delivery (drama, video, community education and leaflets) used in an Information, Education and Communication (IEC) intervention on HIV/AIDS in rural Uganda. Semi-structured interviews (n=37) and focus groups (n=3) were conducted among field staff. Two questionnaires (n=105 and n=69) and focus groups were conducted with community members. More than 85% of the community had seen at least one drama or video and saw them as relevant and realistic. However, the overall message of the plays was often not well understood. …

  3. Culturally-adapted and audio-technology assisted HIV/AIDS awareness and education program in rural Nigeria: a cohort study

    This prospective, 14-week cohort study sought to identify changes in HIV knowledge using a culturally-adapted, technology assisted educational approach in three rural Nigerian villages. One group of people were given seminar-based education, while another were given a portable, digial audio technology-based educational program, which drew on the rural culture of oral learning. The majority of the participants were Muslim (99%), male (53.3%) and lacked formal education (55%). HIV knowledge was improved by a larger degree in the technology facilitated group than the seminar-based group. …

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