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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. How access to smartphones affects HIV risk among students in Tanzania: a case study of selected high schools in the Dar es Salaam region

    Studies show that smartphone adoption by teenagers in Tanzania has increased substantially, and mobile access to the Internet is pervasive. This study investigated whether the use of smartphones by high-school students in Tanzania raises their awareness of HIV or makes them more vulnerable to its acquisition. Twelve private and government high schools in Ilala and Kinondoni Municipalities, both day and boarding schools, participated in this study. Data collection entailed qualitative and quantitative methods. …

  2. Commentary: Innovations in Programming for HIV Among Adolescents: Towards an AIDS-Free Generation

    In the effort to halt and reverse the spread of HIV and AIDS among adolescents, public health and medical experts, moral and political authorities across the globe have implemented a combination of interventions. …

  3. Factors influencing access and retention in secondary schooling for orphaned and vulnerable children and young people: case studies from high HIV and AIDS prevalence contexts in Lesotho

    The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing access and retention in secondary schooling for orphans and other vulnerable children living in high HIV prevalence areas of Lesotho. A case study approach was used to address this aim. The findings from this study have been used to inform an intervention that seeks to increase access to learning and thereby reduce drop-out and repetition rates in secondary schools. This study and the intervention are part of a larger programme of research known as the SOFIE Project (see http://sofie.ioe.ac.uk). …

  4. Generation Rx.com : how young people use the internet for health information

    The report presents an analysis of the results of Generation Rx.com, a nationally representative, random dial telephone survey of 1209 young people ages 15-24, with an oversample 200 non-white respondents. The survey was designed to examine how young people use Internet for health information: are they turning to the Internet for information on their health and well-being; what types of issues are they researching online; how they go about finding the information they need; do they trust what they learn; does the information they find influence their behaviour.

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