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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Women living with HIV speak out against violence: A collection of essays and reflections of women living with and affected by HIV

    Violence against women and girls is an unacceptable violation of basic human rights. It also is so widespread that ending it must be a global public health priority. An estimated one in three women is beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused by an intimate partner during her lifetime. Intimate partner violence has been shown to increase the risk of HIV infection by around 50%, and violence (and the fear of violence) deters women and girls from seeking services for HIV prevention, treatment, care and support.

  2. Gender inequality and HIV transmission: a global analysis

    Introduction: The HIV pandemic disproportionately impacts young women. Worldwide, young women aged 15–24 are infected with HIV at rates twice that of young men, and young women alone account for nearly a quarter of all new HIV infections. The incommensurate HIV incidence in young – often poor – women underscores how social and economic inequalities shape the HIV epidemic. Confluent social forces, including political and gender violence, poverty, racism, and sexism impede equal access to therapies and effective care, but most of all constrain the agency of women. …

  3. Women out loud: How women living with HIV will help the world end AIDS

    Women may make up half the world’s population, but they do not share it equally. This is especially evident when it comes to HIV. Half of all people living with HIV are women, yet many are underserved or do not know their status. Despite the many successes we have seen, women still face inequalities that will keep the AIDS response from reaching its full potential.

  4. Analysis of services to address gender-based violence in three countries

    In 2010, AIDSTAR-One conducted case studies in three countries where GBV services were available. …

  5. Pasa la Voz (Spread the Word): Using Women's Social Networks for HIV Education and Testing

    Pasa la Voz (spread the word) is a methodology used to prevent HIV using respondent-driven sampling to reach hard to access women. An organization in Ciudad Juarez (Programa Companeros) initiated a one-to-one approach to reaching at-risk and hard to reach women in the area using promotoras (outreach workers) from September 2005 to January 2006. The implementation of Pasa la Voz came on its heels and had success in increasing the number of women agreeing to get tested for HIV (11.9% to 49.9%) and decreasing testing time from 22.70 hours to 3.68 hours per test.

  6. Technical Brief: Integrating Gender into Most At-Risk Populations

    Gender inequity is a fundamental driver in the HIV epidemic, and integrating strategies to address gender inequity and change harmful gender norms is an increasingly important component of HIV programs. Integrating gender strategies into programs targeting most-at-risk populations (MARPs) which include men who have sex with men, transgender people, injecting drug users, and male, female and transgender sex workers, whether in mixed or concentrated epidemic countries is much less prevalent. …

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