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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Is peer education the best approach for HIV prevention in schools? Findings from a randomized controlled trial

    The purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of peer education when compared to teacher-led curricula in AIDS prevention programs conducted in schools in Rome, Italy. The only apparent benefit of the peer-led intervention, compared to that led by teachers, was a greater improvement in knowledge of HIV. Neither of the interventions induced changes in sexual behavior. However, the role of possible biases and methodological problems must be considered when interpreting these results.

  2. Knowledge, Behaviour, Perceptions and Attitudes of University of Ghana Students towards HIV/AIDS: What does Behavioural Surveillance Survey Tell us?

    This study assesses knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in respect of risk of HIV infection of students through behavioral surveillance survey. The study used the systematic sampling approach to select 375 students. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted to solicit information from respondents. The study found out that the students engaged in pre-marital sex, although this was more common among the male than female students. Students did not use condoms consistently and were not likely to use condoms when the relationship was considered as stable because of trust. …

  3. Effectiveness of an HIV prevention program for secondary school students in Mongolia

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effectiveness of a 3-year human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention program for adolescents attending secondary school in Mongolia. METHODS: Comparisons of knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and safe sex practices of grade 10 students from schools with a peer education prevention program to grade 10 students from schools without the intervention. Peer education programs were launched in 2000 across Mongolia. …

  4. Youth and HIV/AIDS: can we avoid catastrophe?

    Over 60 million people who have been infected with HIV in the past 20 years, about half became infected between the ages of 15 and 24. Today, nearly 12 million young people are living with HIV/AIDS. Young women are several times more likely than young men to be infected with HIV. In nearly 20 African countries 5 percent or more of women ages 15 to 24 are infected. Such statistics underscore the urgent need to address HIV/AIDS among youth.

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