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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. A model for the delivery of evidence-based PSHE (personal wellbeing) in secondary schools

    Personal Social Health and Economic (PSHE) education is a non-statutory school subject designed to facilitate the delivery of a number of key competencies relevant to health, safety and wellbeing. As well as contributing to learning objectives in regards to these topics PSHE education has been ascribed with weighty expectations for outcomes well beyond the classroom relating to physical, mental, sexual and emotional health and safety. …

  2. Bridging the gap between evidence and practice: a multi-perspective examination of real-world drug education

    Aims: The study examined normative school drug-education practice in Scotland and the extent to which it reflected the evidence base for effective drug education. Methods: Current guidance in Scotland was compared with systematic review evidence on drug-education effectiveness; a survey was mailed to primary, secondary and special schools (928 questionnaires returned); and 100 drug-education lessons were systematically observed across 40 schools. Findings: Nearly all schools provided drug education but modes of delivery and learning approaches did not always reflect the evidence base. …

  3. Drug prevention programmes in schools: what is the evidence?

    Key messages: Universal drug education programmes in schools have been shown to have an impact on the most common substances used by young people: alcohol, tobacco and cannabis. The approaches which appear to be most effective are those based on social influences and life skills, for example Life Skills Training and Unplugged. Interventions which are not drug-specific but focus on children and young people’s attachment to school can also be effective in reducing substance misuse. The Good Behaviour Game is one example of these. …

  4. Breaking through the clouds : a Participatory Action Research (PAR) Project with migrant children and youth along the borders of China, Myanmar and Thailand

    A report on the Participatory Action Research (PAR) project implemented by Save the Children's Southeast & East Asia and the Pacific Regional Office during April 1999 to March 2001 with funding from the Department of International Development (UK). The PAR project is a new approach to learning, documenting and developing potential for change. The participants of PAR project strongly recommend this approach as an effective way to address sensitive issues to children and youth in vulnerable situations.

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