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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Sexuality education in South Africa: Three essential questions

    Sex education is the cornerstone on which most HIV/AIDS prevention programmes rest and since the adoption of Outcomes-Based Education (OBE), has become a compulsory part of the South African school curriculum through the Life Orientation learning area. However, while much focus has been on providing young people with accurate and frank information about safe sex, this paper questions whether school based programmes sufficiently support the needs of young people. …

  2. Health club formation and management guide. HIV and AIDS eToolkit for teachers and schools in Swaziland

    This document focuses on health clubs, which consists of a group of students/pupils who: - Are determined to control and prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS through peer education, life skills education and sexual reproductive health; - Have decided to protect themselves from HIV/AIDS and help other people to do the same; - May be living positively with HIV/AIDS and are determined to encourage others to do the same; - Are determined to challenge prejudices and fears which stigmatize infected people; - Are prepared to help people to develop and practice understanding, support, and a sense of communi …

  3. Kenya OVC support for Orphans and Vulnerable Children Affected by HIV/AIDS: Track 2011, final report

    The USAID-funded Support for Orphans and Vulnerable Children affected by HIV/AIDS project (referred to as Kenya OVC Track I from here onwards) was a six-month follow-on award to the five-year Breaking Barriers Project, implemented in Kenya, Uganda, and Zambia, that ended in September 2010. Kenya OVC Track 1 continued to build on the Breaking Barrier project in Kenya to support orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) in Nairobi, Siaya, and Kisumu counties in the country. …

  4. Addressing the needs of young adolescents

    Worldwide, nearly 10 percent of people are ages 10 to 14, and in developing countries, the percentage is often higher (e.g., Uganda, 16 percent).1 Early adolescence marks a critical time of physical, developmental, and social changes. Interventions during early adolescence may be more effective in shaping healthy attitudes and behaviors than in late adolescence, when attitudes and behaviors are more established. Young adolescents are also more likely to still be in school and less likely to have begun sexual activity.

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