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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Orphans and vulnerable children: Trends in school access and experience in Eastern and Southern Africa

    Across sub-Saharan Africa, the AIDS pandemic has impacted children in a myriad of ways, from parental loss, to HIV infection, to increased poverty and marginalization. These children have been labeled orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) in the international development literature, and a range of interventions have provided services aiming to mitigate the impact of the crisis on human development outcomes, including education. …

  2. Schools as Agencies of Protection in Namibia and Swaziland: Can They Prevent Dropout and Child Labor in the Context of HIV/AIDS and Poverty?

    This article addresses a particular area of research in the field of education and child protection: the protective role of schools in the contexts of HIV/AIDS and poverty. Such adverse situations may lead children not to enroll in school or to drop out of school and subsequently to be subjected to abusive child labor and, in some cases, the worst forms of child labor (WFCL). …

  3. The Impact of the HIV/AIDS and Economic Crises on Orphans and Other Vulnerable children in Zimbabwe

    Zimbabwe, like most of Sub-Saharian Africa, has been hard-hit by HIV/AIDS. National estimates reported by the Ministry of Health and Child Welfare put the prevalence rates of HIV in the age group between 15 and 49 at 15.3% (WHO, UNICEF, & UNAIDS, 2008). This is one of the highest HIV/AIDS prevalence rates in the world (UNAIDS, 2008). The impact of the pandemic has been so severe that current mitigation efforts fall short of alleviating the situation, especially as it pertains to the plight of children. …

  4. A novel economic intervention to reduce HIV risks among school-going AIDS orphans in rural Uganda

    This study tested an economic intervention to reduce HIV risks among AIDS-orphaned adolescents. Adolescents (n = 96) were randomly assigned to receive the intervention or usual care for orphans in Uganda. All adolescents in the study received usual care for AIDS orphans in Uganda, which included peer counseling, health education, and scholastic materials. In addition, experimental adolescents received a family economic intervention, which included a Child/Youth Development Account (CDA) and six 2-hour classes on career planning, career goals, microfinance, and financial well-being. …

  5. Orphanhood and completion of compulsory school education among young people in South Africa: findings from a national representative survey

    We examined the association of orphanhood and completion of compulsory school education among young people in South Africa. In South Africa, school attendance is compulsory through grade 9, which should be completed before age 16. However, family and social factors such as orphanhood and poverty can hinder educational attainment. Participants were 10,452 16-24-year-olds who completed a South African national representative household survey. Overall, 23% had not completed compulsory school levels. …

  6. The impact of HIV/AIDS on poverty and education in Africa

    This article deals with the impact of the HIV/AIDS pandemic on poverty and education in Africa. It considers the scale and scope of the pandemic and its anticipated impact on education systems in heavily infected sub-Saharan African countries. It looks for lessons derived from twenty years of coping with HIV/AIDS in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region. …

  7. Working-age adult mortality and primary school attendance in rural Kenya

    The rapid increase in adult mortality due to the AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa raises great concern about potential intergenerational effects on children. This article estimates the impact of AIDS-related adult mortality on primary school attendance in rural Kenya using a panel of 1,266 households surveyed in 1997, 2000, and 2002. The paper distinguishes between effects on boys' and girls' education to understand potential gender differences resulting from adult mortality. We also estimate how adult mortality affects child schooling before as well as after the death occurs. …

  8. Where have all the flowers gone? A preliminary analysis of the decline in first year school enrolment in KwaZulu Natal and possible links to HIV/AIDS

    Enrolment is the single most important statistic in education, given its impact on every other element of supply and demand. The purpose of the analysis is to explore possible reasons forthe decline in first year school enrolment in KwaZulu Natal and suggest that the impact of HIV/AIDS may be a significant factor. It will also argue that if indeed HIV/AIDS is partially or even largely responsible for the decline, it is first and foremost a management issue of the greatest importance, irrespective of the problem's source. …

  9. The education sectors' responses to the needs and vulnerabilities of children affected by HIV/AIDS

    Education is a crucial factor in the development of a child. In the light of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, education has become even more vital. The paradox, nevertheless, is that the pandemic has constrained school attendance, as well as school performance. The purpose of this study was to establish to what extent primary school-aged children affected by HIV/AIDS (CABA) are educationally affected, as well as to find out how the education sector is responding to the problems CABA face. …

  10. Responding to the education needs of children and adolescents affected by AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. Report on Town Hall Meeting, October 23, 2001

    On October 23, 2001, more than 100 people gathered at Peace Corps headquarters in Washington, D.C., for the third in a series of Town Hall Meetings to address the needs of orphans and vulnerable children in developing countries. The meeting focused on the challenge of educating children and adolescents affected by AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. By bringing together participants from a wide range of groups, including from both the education and health sectors, organizers hoped to stimulate a useful exchange of information. …

  11. Reasons for non-attendance of orphans, children from disjointed families who live with both parents: Evidence from questionnaires and children's drawings

    The paper uses a combination of questionnaire data and children's drawings to explore the reasons contributing to temporary and permanent absence from school of orphans, children from disjointed families and children who live with both parents. Particular attention is paid to differences between these three groups of children and between girls and boys. It is shown that the most important reasons for absenteeism are closely related to poverty, and that poverty is not necessarily related to orphanhood. …

  12. Orphans' Household Circumstances and Access to Education in a Maturing HIV Epidemic in Eastern Zimbabwe

    Levels of orphanhood and patterns of different forms (i.e.: double, paternal and maternal) of orphanhood will change as an HIV epidemic progresses. The implications of different forms of orphanhood for children's development will also change as the cumulative impact of a period of sustained high morbidity and mortality takes its toll on the adult population. In this article, we describe patterns of orphanhood and orphans' educational experience in populations in eastern Zimbabwe subject to a major HIV epidemic which is maturing into its endemic phase. …

  13. HIV/AIDS and education

    This paper shows the overlap in the goals and targets for diminishing poverty and the immediate need for action against HIV/AIDS. The epidemic is growing quickly in South Africa and educators and learners need proper care. The report begins by describing the current situation in South Africa and then suggests ways forward.

  14. HIV and AIDS in context: the needs of learners and educators

    The following 'think piece' is a collection of observations selected principally from a very rapid September 2003 tour of Malawi, Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania and Uganda, recent fieldwork in Botswana, Rwanda and Zimbabwe, and UNESCO Nairobi cluster workshops on education and teachers held in Kigali and Kampala early in 2003. The 2003 tour confirmed previous impressions about where we are and where we need to go. Many of the observations and comments on HIV and teacher education are personal: they are meant to challenge our perceptions of what we are doing and how we are doing it. …

  15. HIV/AIDS, Poverty and Education: The circle of hope and despair

    This article concerns the impact that HIV/Aids, as a pandemic, is having on education, within the context of the poverty discourse. It considers the scale and scope of the pandemic and its anticipated impact on education systems in heavily-infected sub-Saharan countries. It looks for lessons derived from twenty years of coping with HIV/Aids in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region. …

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