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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Learning content in sexuality education

    A guide written by the government of the province of Quebec to explain to parents what their children will learn in sexuality education from primary to secondary school.

  2. Parents’ and teachers’ views on sexual health education and screening for sexually transmitted infections among in-school adolescent girls in Kenya: a qualitative study

    Background: To successfully develop and implement school-based sexual health interventions for adolescent girls, such as screening for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis, it is important to understand parents’ and teachers’ attitudes towards sexual health education and acceptability of sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening interventions. Methods: In this qualitative study, we approached parents and teachers from three high schools to participate in in-depth interviews (IDIs) and focus-group discussions (FGDs). …

  3. A parent's guide to comprehensive sexuality education. 2016 calendar

    Eastern and Southern Africa have some of the highest rates of HIV prevalence among young people in the world. Now more than ever, they need accurate information and supports regarding their sexual and reproductive health. From television and radio programmes, the internet, movies and friends, young people, including your child, are being exposed to untrusted information everywhere - and it’s often inaccurate. Your child needs the right information about their sexuality so they can make informed and safe decisions about their life and future. …

  4. Why? Who? Where? What? And How? to talk to parents and guardians about sexual and reproductive health [Engaging Communities in Comprehensive Sexuality Education]

    This guide forms part of a toolkit on "Engaging Communities in Comprehensive Sexuality Education'. It provides advice to children on how to talk to their parents about issues relating to sex and sexuality.

  5. Talking to your child about sexual and reproductive health [Engaging Communities in Comprehensive Sexuality Education]

    This guide forms part of a toolkit on 'Engaging Communities in Comprehensive Sexuality Education'. It provides advice to parents on why, when and how to talk to their children about sex and sexuality.

  6. It's good to teach them, but … they should also know when to apply it: parents’ views and attitudes towards Fiji's Family Life Education curriculum

    A Family Life Education (FLE) curriculum was introduced in Fiji schools in 2010 in response to concern about increasing teenage pregnancies and young people's vulnerability to sexually transmitted infections and other health and social problems. However, conservative and suspicious parental attitudes towards FLE have been an obstacle. The need for an educational programme for parents to complement the FLE curriculum taught in schools is now urgent. This study examines parents' views on the sex and sexuality component of the FLE curriculum. …

  7. Perception of students’ teachers’ and parents’ towards sexuality education in Calabar south local government area of Cross River State, Nigeria

    This study was aimed at assessing the perception of students, teachers and perception in Calabar south local government area of Cross River State, Nigeria. A cross sectional survey was employed and a structured questionnaire was used to generate both qualitative and quantitative data from 850 respondents using the multi-stage stratified sampling technique. Most students were within the age bracket of 13-18 476 (95.2%), teachers were mostly within 25-29 years 54 (27.0%) and parents were mostly 40-44 years of age 22 (22.0%). …

  8. Sexuality education in New Zealand: What adolescents are being taught and what they really want to know

    Sexuality education is the only subject in New Zealand schools which requires parents to be consulted on the content. Since it is associated with moral and social issues, it is a controversial topic. However, what has been notably missing from the debate is the voice of those most immediately concerned with the outcome— the adolescent.

  9. Exploring the opinions of parents and teachers about young people receiving puberty and sex education in rural Kenya: a qualitative study

    In Kenya, one of the most significant public health concerns is the spread of HIV. Additionally, 13,000 girls drop out of school every year due to pregnancy. Although the Kenyan Ministry of Education and other independent organisations have tried to implement various means of developing puberty and sexual health education for young people, the situation is not improving. Aims: To explore the opinions of teachers and parents in rural Kenya about delivering puberty and sex education and to identify their perceptions of barriers to young people accessing this education. …

  10. Gender, sex and HIV: How to adress issues that no-one want to hear about

    This paper discusses the limitations of conventional Information, Education and Communication (IEC) approaches to HIV prevention and describes Stepping Stones, one approach which 1) is more holistic in recognising the location of HIV in a broader sexual and reproductive health (SRH) context; 2) emphasises the importance of a gendered perspective throughout; and 3) works on the basis that, with good facilitation, ordinary community members are those most able to develop the best solutions for their own sexual health needs.

  11. Parent-teen communication about sex in urban Thai families

    This study describes sexual communication among Thai parents and their teens and identifies variables related to communication about sex in urban Thai families. Data were derived from 420 families whose teenage children ages 13-14 years were randomly selected using the probability proportional to size technique. Interviews were conducted with 1 parent and 1 teenage child in each family. In-depth interviews were also conducted in 30 parents and teens drawn from the same 420 families. …

  12. Sexuality and religion

    Faith and religion can play very important roles in many young people’s lives; they can influence your choices, values and your way of life. Faith also helps you make choices about your sexuality, your relationships and your sexual and reproductive health. In this issue we also talk about the role of parents and give some tips on how to improve communication and resolve conflicts between parents and young people on sexual matters.

  13. Support for comprehensive sexuality education: perspectives from parents of school-age youth

    Controversy about school-based sexuality education in public schools has continued over the past decade, despite mounting evidence that comprehensive sexuality education effectively promotes sexual health and that parents support these programs in public schools. The present study replicates and expands upon previous findings regarding public views on school-based sexuality education. …

  14. Sex and relationships education in other countries

    In November 2009, the NFER's International Information Unit (comprising the Eurydice Unit for England, Wales and Northern Ireland1 and the team responsible for the International Review of Curriculum and Assessment Frameworks Internet Archive - INCA) completed some desk research on the ways in which sex and relationships education is provided in a number of countries worldwide. This aimed to answer the following questions: What is taught about sex and relationships education, and to what age group? Which elements of this are compulsory? …

  15. Parents and SRE: a Sex Education Forum evidence briefing

    This evidence briefing sets out the views and experiences of parents in relation to the sex and relationships education (SRE) of their children - both at home and at school. The thoughts and experiences of children and young people about their parents' role in SRE are presented in parallel. The briefing addresses the following eight questions, with key findings summarised at the end. 1. What is sex and relationships education? 2. Who do children and young people want to learn from? 3. What role do parents see for themselves in SRE? 4. What role do parents see for schools in SRE? 5. …

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