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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Teenage pregnancy and parenting at school in contemporary South African contexts: deconstructing school narratives and understanding policy implementation

    South African national education policy is committed to promoting gender equality at school and to facilitating the successful completion of all young people’s schooling, including those who may become pregnant and parent while at school. However, the experience of being pregnant and parenting while being a learner is shaped by broader social and school-based responses to teenage pregnancy, parenting and female sexuality in general. …

  2. Parents' perceptions of HIV counselling and testing in schools: ethical, legal and social implications

    In view of the high prevalence of HIV and AIDS in South Africa, particularly among adolescents, the Departments of Health and Education have proposed a school-based HIV counselling and testing (HCT) campaign to reduce HIV infections and sexual risk behaviour. Through the use of semi-structured interviews, our qualitative study explored perceptions of parents regarding the ethico-legal and social implications of the proposed campaign. Despite some concerns, parents were generally in favour of the HCT campaign. …

  3. Books and babies. Pregnancy and young parents in schools

    Being pregnant and a young parent in South African schools is not easy. Books and Babies examines why this is the case. Drawing on both quantitative and qualitative research conducted in secondary schools in Durban and Cape Town, the book explores how teachers and principals respond to the presence of pregnant learners and young parents in school, and surveys the attitudes of fellow learners towards them. …

  4. Child consent in South African law: Implications for researchers, service providers and policy-makers

    Children under 18 are legal minors who, in South African law, are not fully capable of acting independently without assistance from parents/legal guardians. However, in recognition of the evolving capacity of children, there are exceptional circumstances where the law has granted minors the capacity to act independently. …

  5. Sociodemographic variations in communication on sexuality and HIV/AIDS with parents, family members and teachers among in-school adolescents: a multi-site study in Tanzania and South Africa

    This paper aims to identify with whom in-school adolescents preferred to communicate about sexuality, and to study adolescents' communication on HIV/AIDS, abstinence and condoms with parents/guardians, other adult family members, and teachers. Data were obtained from a baseline questionnaire survey carried out in South Africa (Cape Town and Mankweng) and Tanzania (Dar es Salaam) in early 2004. We analysed data for 14,944 adolescents from 80 randomly selected schools. The mean ages were as follows: CapeTown, 13.38 years (standard deviation (SD). …

  6. Conducting a parent involvement workshop: a manual for educators and practitioners

    Sexual education is a lifelong learning experience. Parents/caregivers however do not approach sexuality education in this manner, with talks either taking place sporadically or in isolated bits and pieces. Research has proven that adolescents who maintain a close connection with their family are more likely to delay their sexual debut. Parents/caregivers often do not have the necessary skills to engage in discussions around sexuality. A greater partnership with schools is one way to enhance communication between parents/caregivers and their children. …

  7. loveLife's for Us: The 2001 National Survey of South African Youth

    This survey was designed to shed light on how South African youth view their lives today and what they think about their futures, with a particular focus on HIV/AIDS and sexual behaviour. The survey also provides some data on South African young people's awareness of loveLife - South Africa's national HIV/AIDS prevention programme for youth.In addition parents and guardians were also surveyed about their views and experiences related to open communication about sexuality.

  8. Who cares? AIDS Review 2001

    "Who cares?" looks at the levels of HIV/AIDS commitment and care - in the international community, in Africa and inSouth Africa. It askes the question "Who cares?" both in the sense of how we should think about care and commitment, and whether - beyond the rhetoric - we care at all."Who cares?" is largely a reflective document - one that will stir discussion, challenge and response.

  9. HIV and AIDS in your school. What parents need to know

    This little book is about HIV, AIDS and Education. It has been written by the Department of Education for parents. It has been written to encourage and assist parents to become partners in responding to HIV and AIDS in our schools and communities.The book will answer some basic questions about HIV and AIDS. Most importantly, it will help parents understand how to work together with the school to protect their children against HIV.

  10. (Over) extended. AIDS Review 2003

    Review 2003 asks the question: how does the epidemic impact on families and the personal relationships between family members - between partners, between husbands and wives, between parents and their children and between siblings? …

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