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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. State of world population 2018: the power of choice: reproductive rights and the demographic transition

    The global trend towards smaller families is a reflection of people making reproductive choices to have as few or as many children as they want, when they want. When people lack choice, it can have a long-term impact on fertility rates, often making them higher or lower than what most people desire.

  2. Identifying and supporting children affected by parental substance use: resource for schools

    When schools and teachers think about ‘drugs’, they may often initially focus on incidents on school grounds and how to respond to them, students at risk of using substances, or perhaps about drug education. However, substance use can impact the lives of young people in many ways, especially if they are affected by problematic drug or alcohol use in their own homes. This resource aims to summarise the key issues for children affected by parental substance use, and how schools can consider supporting them. …

  3. Engaging parents in drug education in schools and in the community

    This briefing paper is part of a series produced by the Drug Education Forum, for schools and others involved in drug education or informal drug prevention. Parents have a strong influence over young people’s decisions regarding drugs and alcohol, perhaps more than they realise. …

  4. Co-designing the teenage pregnancy and young parent strategy

    In response to the recommendations from the Scottish Parliament’s Health and Sport Committee’s Inquiry into Teenage Pregnancy in 2013, the Scottish Government committed to producing a Teenage Pregnancy and Young Parents Strategy. …

  5. Guidelines: Substance abuse prevention programmes and interventions in state schools​

    Choosing the best approach to drug education is a key task for all stakeholders in the field of prevention. This proposal aims to reduce repetition and minimize class disruptions whilst ensuring that effective drug prevention programmes are in place. The proposal also aims to give clear guidelines on how the different stakeholders can complement each other’s interventions within a school setting. Prevention programmes provide practical tools to educate children and young persons about substance abuse. …

  6. Visibility without being in the spotlight: Some suggestions for primary schools that want to be open for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender families

    There is an increasing number of “rainbow families”: families where one or both parents or/and co-care takers are lesbian, homosexual, bisexual or transgender. Although the upbringing of children in such rainbow families does not differ from heterosexual families, rainbow families often have to deal with specific challenges. They often get negative or prejudiced comments and questions about their family composition. Parents, their children, but also their environment have to learn how to deal with such events. This makes rainbow families different to some extent. …

  7. Évaluation du dispositif expérimental « ABCD de l’égalité »

    L’inspection générale de l’éducation nationale a été chargée de l’évaluation du dispositif expérimental "ABCD de l’égalité". Copilotée par les ministères de l’éducation nationale et des droits des femmes, cette opération visait à "susciter une évolution positive des attitudes des enseignants et des élèves des deux sexes" conformément aux engagements arrêtés par la "convention interministérielle pour l’égalité entre les filles et les garçons, les femmes et les hommes dans le système éducatif" valant pour la période 2013-2018. …

  8. Attitudes of parents of young men towards the inclusion of sexual orientation and homophobia on the Irish post-primary curriculum

    The ‘Exploring Masculinities’ (EM) programme was piloted in 22 Irish single-sex boys’ post-primary schools during the late 1990s. Following objections from some influential journalists and an organisation representing parents whose sons attended Catholic secondary schools, the Minister for Education and Science put the planned dissemination of the programme on hold. The concerns of the objectors included the proposed treatment of sexual orientation and homophobia in the context of the school curriculum. …

  9. Sex and relationships education in other countries

    In November 2009, the NFER's International Information Unit (comprising the Eurydice Unit for England, Wales and Northern Ireland1 and the team responsible for the International Review of Curriculum and Assessment Frameworks Internet Archive - INCA) completed some desk research on the ways in which sex and relationships education is provided in a number of countries worldwide. This aimed to answer the following questions: What is taught about sex and relationships education, and to what age group? Which elements of this are compulsory? …

  10. Guidelines for an LGBTQ inclusive education

    In Europe, school is where young lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer people face the most discrimination. When IGLYO, in partnership with ILGA-Europe, conducted a European study in 2006, as many as 61% of the young LGBT respondents reported negative personal experiences in schools: social exclusion, bullying, harassment, verbal and physical aggressions, and curriculum-based discrimination on the basis of their perceived gender identity and/or sexual orientation. The present Guidelines are not the ultimate guide to LGBTQ-friendly schools and universities. …

  11. Including different families

    Stonewall's Education Guide on including different families provides essential information for secondary, and especially primary school staff. Advances in gay equality over the last decade mean that there are increasing numbers of children with same-sex parents in British schools.This guide provides advice on how to include same-sex parents in the school community, how to address lesbian and gay issues in the classroom, and how to ensure that your teaching reflects the reality of life in the 21st century. …

  12. Parents and SRE: a Sex Education Forum evidence briefing

    This evidence briefing sets out the views and experiences of parents in relation to the sex and relationships education (SRE) of their children - both at home and at school. The thoughts and experiences of children and young people about their parents' role in SRE are presented in parallel. The briefing addresses the following eight questions, with key findings summarised at the end. 1. What is sex and relationships education? 2. Who do children and young people want to learn from? 3. What role do parents see for themselves in SRE? 4. What role do parents see for schools in SRE? 5. …

  13. Straight talking: explorations on homosexuality and homophobia in secondary schools in Ireland

    This paper outlines research that was conducted among students, parents, teachers and senior management teams in six secondary schools in the Greater Dublin area of Ireland. The research involved semi-structured interviews and observations. The findings of this research are significant in that it was the first time any data had been gathered on this topic directly from those within the school system. …

  14. Developing support services for children, young people and families living with HIV: a handbook for service providers

    This resource has been designed to offer information, guidance and support to anyone who has an interest in developing, or already runs, support services for children and young people infected with or affected by HIV. The information will be of use to voluntary and community sector organisations and the statutory sector including social workers, health professionals and youth workers. It was developed through three national consultations with statutory, voluntary and health sector professionals held in London, Birmingham and Leeds at the beginning of 2005. …

  15. Parents' approaches to educating their pre-adolescent and adolescent children about sexuality

    The report revealed that younger children often approached parents with questions but that parents were reluctant to discuss sexual matters with them for fear of compromising their innocence. According to the report, while parents didn't always respond fully to questions from their younger children, they reported attempting to raise sexual issues with their teenage children. However, such attempts were often blocked by the young people, who were reluctant to talk about the topic. …

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