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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Understanding child marriage: insights from comparative research

    This is the first policy brief produced by the Young Marriage and Parenthood Study (YMAPS), looking at research findings from Young Lives (Ethiopia, Peru, Vietnam and the Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana) and Child Frontiers (Zambia).

  2. State of world population 2018: the power of choice: reproductive rights and the demographic transition

    The global trend towards smaller families is a reflection of people making reproductive choices to have as few or as many children as they want, when they want. When people lack choice, it can have a long-term impact on fertility rates, often making them higher or lower than what most people desire.

  3. Parents’ and teachers’ views on sexual health education and screening for sexually transmitted infections among in-school adolescent girls in Kenya: a qualitative study

    Background: To successfully develop and implement school-based sexual health interventions for adolescent girls, such as screening for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis, it is important to understand parents’ and teachers’ attitudes towards sexual health education and acceptability of sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening interventions. Methods: In this qualitative study, we approached parents and teachers from three high schools to participate in in-depth interviews (IDIs) and focus-group discussions (FGDs). …

  4. It's good to teach them, but … they should also know when to apply it: parents’ views and attitudes towards Fiji's Family Life Education curriculum

    A Family Life Education (FLE) curriculum was introduced in Fiji schools in 2010 in response to concern about increasing teenage pregnancies and young people's vulnerability to sexually transmitted infections and other health and social problems. However, conservative and suspicious parental attitudes towards FLE have been an obstacle. The need for an educational programme for parents to complement the FLE curriculum taught in schools is now urgent. This study examines parents' views on the sex and sexuality component of the FLE curriculum. …

  5. Teenage pregnancy and parenting at school in contemporary South African contexts: deconstructing school narratives and understanding policy implementation

    South African national education policy is committed to promoting gender equality at school and to facilitating the successful completion of all young people’s schooling, including those who may become pregnant and parent while at school. However, the experience of being pregnant and parenting while being a learner is shaped by broader social and school-based responses to teenage pregnancy, parenting and female sexuality in general. …

  6. Co-designing the teenage pregnancy and young parent strategy

    In response to the recommendations from the Scottish Parliament’s Health and Sport Committee’s Inquiry into Teenage Pregnancy in 2013, the Scottish Government committed to producing a Teenage Pregnancy and Young Parents Strategy. …

  7. Books and babies. Pregnancy and young parents in schools

    Being pregnant and a young parent in South African schools is not easy. Books and Babies examines why this is the case. Drawing on both quantitative and qualitative research conducted in secondary schools in Durban and Cape Town, the book explores how teachers and principals respond to the presence of pregnant learners and young parents in school, and surveys the attitudes of fellow learners towards them. …

  8. Parent-child communication about sexual and reproductive health in rural Tanzania: Implications for young people's sexual health interventions

    Background: Many programmes on young people and HIV/AIDS prevention have focused on the in-school and channeled sexual and reproductive health messages through schools with limited activities for the young people's families. The assumption has been that parents in African families do not talk about sexual and reproductive health (SRH) with their children. These approach has had limited success because of failure to factor in the young person's family context, and the influence of parents. …

  9. Teaching and the HIV/AIDS Pandemic: A School Case Study

    Background: This paper reports case study findings on how a school in Tanzania is attempting to integrate HIV/AIDS education. Methods: Interviews were held with the principal, 8 teachers, 8 pupils, the school nurse and 4 parents; observation of school environment and document analysis of posters, text books and school calendar was carried out to see evidence of HIV/AIDS activities in the school. Results: HIV/AIDS is integrated in the school curricula and some teachers have incorporated participatory pedagogy. However teachers lack support and teaching materials. …

  10. Experiences in socio-cultural approaches to HIV prevention education and empowerment in the Caribbean

    This booklet gives a snap shot of the different socio-cultural approaches to HIV/AIDS prevention in the Caribbean. It presents edu-drama, theatre in education and other alternative media interventions that are geared towards empowering youth, their parents and community leaders to live a healthy lifestyle and create a safe environment within their communities.

  11. Attitudes of parents of young men towards the inclusion of sexual orientation and homophobia on the Irish post-primary curriculum

    The ‘Exploring Masculinities’ (EM) programme was piloted in 22 Irish single-sex boys’ post-primary schools during the late 1990s. Following objections from some influential journalists and an organisation representing parents whose sons attended Catholic secondary schools, the Minister for Education and Science put the planned dissemination of the programme on hold. The concerns of the objectors included the proposed treatment of sexual orientation and homophobia in the context of the school curriculum. …

  12. Children’s school participation and HIV/AIDS in rural Malawi: the role of parental knowledge and perceptions

    Studies of the relationship between HIV/AIDS and children’s educational attainment largely focus on the direct impacts of parental illness and death, overlooking the potential indirect impact that parental knowledge and perceptions of their HIV status may have on children’s school enrollment. Drawing on both quantitative and qualitative evidence from Malawi, this paper finds that women’s real and perceived anticipation of future health shocks has a positive impact on their children’s educational attainment. …

  13. Sex and relationships education in other countries

    In November 2009, the NFER's International Information Unit (comprising the Eurydice Unit for England, Wales and Northern Ireland1 and the team responsible for the International Review of Curriculum and Assessment Frameworks Internet Archive - INCA) completed some desk research on the ways in which sex and relationships education is provided in a number of countries worldwide. This aimed to answer the following questions: What is taught about sex and relationships education, and to what age group? Which elements of this are compulsory? …

  14. Sociodemographic variations in communication on sexuality and HIV/AIDS with parents, family members and teachers among in-school adolescents: a multi-site study in Tanzania and South Africa

    This paper aims to identify with whom in-school adolescents preferred to communicate about sexuality, and to study adolescents' communication on HIV/AIDS, abstinence and condoms with parents/guardians, other adult family members, and teachers. Data were obtained from a baseline questionnaire survey carried out in South Africa (Cape Town and Mankweng) and Tanzania (Dar es Salaam) in early 2004. We analysed data for 14,944 adolescents from 80 randomly selected schools. The mean ages were as follows: CapeTown, 13.38 years (standard deviation (SD). …

  15. Effects of general and homophobic victimization on adolescents' psychosocial and educational concerns: the importance of intersecting identities and parent support

    Many adolescents experience peer victimization, which often can be homophobic. Applying the minority stress model with attention to intersecting social identities, this study tested the effects of general and homophobic victimization on several educational outcomes through suicidality and school belonging among 15,923 adolescents in Grades 7 through 12 on account of their sexual orientation and race/ethnicity. Parent support also was tested as a moderator of these effects. …

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