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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Référentiel pour la détection et la gestion des situations de risques affectant un(e) élève. A l’usage du personnel de l’éducation

    Le présent référentiel, développé à travers un processus consultatif impliquant responsables centraux, autorités éducatives au niveau déconcentré et personnel enseignant, vise à donner des orientations pratiques pour toute personne travaillant dans le secteur de l’éducation, que ce soit dans l’école ou dans les daara, pour mieux détecter les situations de détresse et de violations des droits d’un(e) élève, et mieux gérer les cas identifiés, dans l’intérêt bien compris de l’enfant, à l’interne comme en liaison avec les autres institutions.

  2. HIV Beyond Goal 3: Interconnections between HIV, human rights and sustainable development

    World leaders have committed to ending AIDS through a new framework for action: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and the Sustainable Development Goals. Ending AIDS is now part of a broader health goal (SDG 3): Ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all at all ages; however, the AIDS response must also focus on gender equality, human rights, economic empowerment and education. Interconnectivity actoss the SDGs is critical to the goal of ending AIDS. This paper outlines the interconnections between certain SDG targets, human rights laws and how HIV is linked to these. …

  3. National HIV/AIDS stigma reduction strategy: Stigma and discrimination reduction in the national HIV/AIDS response

    The Nigerian HIV prevalence rate is declining however, stigma indices does not show corresponding decline. Drivers of the HIV epidemic include the structural, contextual and social factors, such as poverty, gender inequality, inequity and poor access to health care, as well as stigma and discrimination and other human rights violations. However, several positive actions have been taken to address stigma and discrimination issues in the country. …

  4. Marital and fertility decision-making. The lived experiences of adolescents and young married couples in Andhra Pradesh and Telangana, India

    This report presents findings from a qualitative sub-study exploring adolescent girls and young couples’ experiences of marital and fertility decision-making in two southern Indian states (Andhra Pradesh and Telangana). Andhra Pradesh and Telangana are among the top states reporting high adolescent fertility: 12 and 11 per cent of young women age 15-19 in Andhra Pradesh and Telangana, respectively, were already mothers or pregnant when surveyed in 2015/16. …

  5. Working for Zero Hunger

    Did you know that there are 815 million people in the world that go to bed hungry, while 1.9 billion people are overweight? The world has set a challenge to achieve Zero Hunger and better nutrition by 2030. But governments can’t do it alone - everyone has a role to play. Come on the Zero Hunger journey with me to discover what each of us -governments, farmers, businesses and the general public- have to do to reach this goal. Learn how you can become part of the Zero Hunger Generation!

  6. Leaving no one behind in the health and education sectors: an SDG stocktake in Ghana

    Ghana has been widely acknowledged as one of sub-Saharan Africa’s ‘rising stars’ during the era of the Millennium Development Goals, and has made substantial progress in improving access to health care and education over the past two decades. However, a step change is now needed to ‘reach the furthest behind first’, as committed in Agenda 2030, if Ghana is to leave no one behind in its progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals. …

  7. Desarrollo humano en República Dominicana: el embarazo en adolescentes: un desafío multidimensional para generar oportunidades en el ciclo de vida

    Teenage pregnancy in the Dominican Republic is a complex problem and of high concern to the national agenda. Available data indicate that 22% of women between 12-19 years have been pregnant. This rate is 34% higher than the average for Latin America and the Caribbean. Teenage pregnancy is concentrated in specific areas of the country – the southern provinces and central Cibao - as well as among poorer people. The fact that the indicator (adolescent fertility rate) has shown little variation in the last three decades makes the picture complex. …

  8. From evidence to action: results from the 2013 baseline survey for the BALIKA project

    The objective of the “BALIKA: Bangladeshi Association for Life Skills, Income, and Knowledge for Adolescents” project is to generate programmatic evidence to delay marriage in Bangladesh. This report documents baseline data from a survey conducted in 96 villages in the districts of Khulna, Narail, and Satkhira on a range of related indicators on education, livelihoods, sexual and reproductive health, and social life. …

  9. LGBTI in OECD countries: a review

    This paper presents an overview of the socio-economic situation of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, transgender and intersex people (LGBTI), primarily in OECD countries. After investigating the size of this population, the paper zooms in on attitudes toward LGBTI, LGBTI rights and perceived discrimination among LGBTI. It goes on to discuss the empirical strategies used to identify whether LGBTI fare worse than non-LGBTI and provides a systematic review of survey-based and experimental evidence on such an “LGBTI penalty” and its causes. This exploration points to substantial hurdles for LGBTI. …

  10. Understanding teenage fertility, cohabitation, and marriage: the case of Peru

    This paper intends to contribute to the economic literature that investigates the origins of teenage pregnancy and early marriage/co habitation in Peru and to improve understanding of the risk factors of one important gender-related issue that has historically provoked asymmetric costs for boys and girls. …

  11. Impact of the provision of school lunch on attendance in remote rural Jamaican primary schools

    This study examined the attendance patterns by region of schools which participated in School Feeding Programmes (SFPs) in poor, remote rural areas of Jamaica and determined wether there was a significant difference in attendance over a 10 year period between children who took different lunch types. The study revealed peaks and troughs in the average annual attendance by region, but found no significant difference in attendance by lunch type. …

  12. Menstruation and the cycle of poverty: a cluster quasi-randomised control trial of sanitary pad and puberty education provision in Uganda

    Background: Poor menstrual knowledge and access to sanitary products have been proposed as barriers to menstrual health and school attendance. In response, interventions targeting these needs have seen increasing implementation in public and private sectors. However, there has been limited assessment of their effectiveness. …

  13. Case study: Costa Rica’s school child and adolescent food and nutrition programme

    Costa Rica’s School Child and Adolescent Food and Nutrition Programme (PANEA) is an example of a consolidated school feeding programme mostly funded by the central government and managed at school level by School Education Boards. It is part of the government’s efforts to reduce poverty and to ensure poor families’ children’s enrolment and retention within the education system, and its main service is the School Canteen. …

  14. Kenya: Healthy Outcomes through Prevention Education (HOPE). Final evaluation

    In Kenya, high poverty, insecurity, poor health outcomes, substance abuse and low levels of education make young people, especially girls, vulnerable to a variety of risks such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), other Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and Diseases (STDs), and Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV). …

  15. Accessing the ‘right’ kinds of material and symbolic capital: the role of cash transfers in reducing adolescent school absence and risky behaviour in South Africa

    This article investigates how well South Africa’s Child Support Grant (CSG) responds to the material and psychosocial needs of adolescents, and the resultant effects on schooling and risky behaviour. One driver of schooling decisions is shame related to poverty and the ‘social cost’ of school, where a premium must often be paid for fashionable clothes or accessories. The other driver relates to symbolic and consumptive capital gained through engaging in sexual exchange relationships. The anticipated impacts from the CSG are partial because of these non-material drivers of adolescent choices. …

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