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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Population Brief

    Articles from this issue : Making sexuality and HIV education programs more effective | Reducing adolescent girls’ vulnerability to sexual violence in sub-Saharan Africa | Developing a highly acceptable contraceptive vaginal ring | Creating a database of HIV prevention clinical trial terminology and translations.

  2. Orphans and vulnerable children: Trends in school access and experience in Eastern and Southern Africa

    Across sub-Saharan Africa, the AIDS pandemic has impacted children in a myriad of ways, from parental loss, to HIV infection, to increased poverty and marginalization. These children have been labeled orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) in the international development literature, and a range of interventions have provided services aiming to mitigate the impact of the crisis on human development outcomes, including education. …

  3. Schools as Agencies of Protection in Namibia and Swaziland: Can They Prevent Dropout and Child Labor in the Context of HIV/AIDS and Poverty?

    This article addresses a particular area of research in the field of education and child protection: the protective role of schools in the contexts of HIV/AIDS and poverty. Such adverse situations may lead children not to enroll in school or to drop out of school and subsequently to be subjected to abusive child labor and, in some cases, the worst forms of child labor (WFCL). …

  4. Changes in HIV prevalence among differently educated groups in Tanzania between 2003 and 2007

    Objective: HIV prevalence trends suggest that the epidemic is stable or declining in many sub-Saharan African countries. However, trends might differ between socioeconomic groups. Educational attainment is a common measure of socioeconomic position in HIV datasets from Africa. Several studies have shown higher HIV prevalence among more educated groups, but this may change over time. We describe changes in HIV prevalence by educational attainment in Tanzania from 2003 to 2007. …

  5. A novel economic intervention to reduce HIV risks among school-going AIDS orphans in rural Uganda

    This study tested an economic intervention to reduce HIV risks among AIDS-orphaned adolescents. Adolescents (n = 96) were randomly assigned to receive the intervention or usual care for orphans in Uganda. All adolescents in the study received usual care for AIDS orphans in Uganda, which included peer counseling, health education, and scholastic materials. In addition, experimental adolescents received a family economic intervention, which included a Child/Youth Development Account (CDA) and six 2-hour classes on career planning, career goals, microfinance, and financial well-being. …

  6. HIV prevention for South African youth: which interventions work? A systematic review of current evidence

    South Africa's HIV prevalence among 15-24 year olds is one of the highest in the world. This systematic review looks at the evidence for youth HIV prevention in the country since 2000 and critically assesses interventions across four domains: study design and outcomes; intervention design; thematic focus and HIV causal pathways; and intervention delivery. Eight interventions were included in the review, all similar regarding content and objectives, but with variouis thematic foci, causal pathways, theoretical bases, delivery methods, intensity and duration. …

  7. As simple as ABC? How rural ABET Centres respond to HIV/AIDS

    This article investigates the ways in which two rural Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET) Centres in the Limpopo Province address the challenges of HIV/AIDS. Theories of social capital are used to explain the different responses of the Centres. The communities surrounding both Centres face similar structural problems of poverty, unemployment, migrancy, gender inequality, poor health and low levels of education. In one Centre, educators and learners denied that HIV/AIDS was a serious issue. …

  8. Orphanhood and completion of compulsory school education among young people in South Africa: findings from a national representative survey

    We examined the association of orphanhood and completion of compulsory school education among young people in South Africa. In South Africa, school attendance is compulsory through grade 9, which should be completed before age 16. However, family and social factors such as orphanhood and poverty can hinder educational attainment. Participants were 10,452 16-24-year-olds who completed a South African national representative household survey. Overall, 23% had not completed compulsory school levels. …

  9. The impact of HIV/AIDS on poverty and education in Africa

    This article deals with the impact of the HIV/AIDS pandemic on poverty and education in Africa. It considers the scale and scope of the pandemic and its anticipated impact on education systems in heavily infected sub-Saharan African countries. It looks for lessons derived from twenty years of coping with HIV/AIDS in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region. …

  10. Emerging Voices: A Report on Education in South African Rural Communities

    This report acknowledges the voices of members of rural communities across South Africa, and ensures that policies undertaken to improve the quality of rural education are informed by the powerful insights of the people in those communities. The research for this book aimed to find out what the rural poor experience as education and what these communities think should be done to deal with the problems of education in the context of rural poverty.

  11. Working-age adult mortality and primary school attendance in rural Kenya

    The rapid increase in adult mortality due to the AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa raises great concern about potential intergenerational effects on children. This article estimates the impact of AIDS-related adult mortality on primary school attendance in rural Kenya using a panel of 1,266 households surveyed in 1997, 2000, and 2002. The paper distinguishes between effects on boys' and girls' education to understand potential gender differences resulting from adult mortality. We also estimate how adult mortality affects child schooling before as well as after the death occurs. …

  12. Where have all the flowers gone? A preliminary analysis of the decline in first year school enrolment in KwaZulu Natal and possible links to HIV/AIDS

    Enrolment is the single most important statistic in education, given its impact on every other element of supply and demand. The purpose of the analysis is to explore possible reasons forthe decline in first year school enrolment in KwaZulu Natal and suggest that the impact of HIV/AIDS may be a significant factor. It will also argue that if indeed HIV/AIDS is partially or even largely responsible for the decline, it is first and foremost a management issue of the greatest importance, irrespective of the problem's source. …

  13. The education sectors' responses to the needs and vulnerabilities of children affected by HIV/AIDS

    Education is a crucial factor in the development of a child. In the light of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, education has become even more vital. The paradox, nevertheless, is that the pandemic has constrained school attendance, as well as school performance. The purpose of this study was to establish to what extent primary school-aged children affected by HIV/AIDS (CABA) are educationally affected, as well as to find out how the education sector is responding to the problems CABA face. …

  14. The construction of gender in times of change: a case study of school-based HIV/AIDS education in Kilimanjaro

    This case study utilized qualitative and quantitative methods to examine how gender, power and HIV/AIDS merge to create situations of risk and vulnerability for young people in the Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania. Questionnaires were collected from 160 secondary school students, while qualitative data came from 3 focus group discussions (one mixed and two single sex), interviews with one male and one female parent, one male and one female teacher, and an educational representative, in addition to observation. …

  15. The social demand for schooling in HIV/AIDS affected populations in Tanzania: summary results from a field survey

    This paper justifies and explores the results of a social demand survey for primary school enrolment in Tanzania. This records and analyses the evidence derived from a structured household-based survey in rural and urban school catchments in two regions of the country (Iringa and Dodoma) with children and their guardians which explores the social demand for primary schooling, especially in relation to household poverty indices and changing labour in households affected by prolonged illness and death. …

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