• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 6 results in 0.026 seconds.

Search results

  1. Education, HIV, and early fertility: experimental evidence from Kenya

    A seven-year randomized evaluation suggests education subsidies reduce adolescent girls’ dropout, pregnancy, and marriage but not sexually transmitted infection (STI). The government’s HIV curriculum, which stresses abstinence until marriage, does not reduce pregnancy or STI. Both programs combined reduce STI more, but cut dropout and pregnancy less, than education subsidies alone. …

  2. Tuko Pamoja: A guide for peer educators

    This guide was developed by PATH as part of the Kenya Adolescent Reproductive Health Project (KARHP) Tuko Pamoja ("We are together") series. It is intended to be used by peer educators facilitating discussion groups with in- and out-of-school youth. The guide will help peer educators share information and lead discussions with their peers on addressing physical and emotional changes during adolescence, staying healthy, planning for the future, making good decisions, and preventing pregnancy and HIV and AIDS. …

  3. Relative Risks and the Market for Sex: Teenagers, Sugar Daddies and HIV in Kenya

    An information campaign that provided Kenyan teenagers in randomly selected schools with the information that HIV prevalence was much higher among adult men and their partners than among teenage boys led to a 65% decrease in the incidence of pregnancies by adult partners among teenage girls in the treatment group relative to the comparison. This suggests a large reduction in the incidence of unprotected cross-generational sex. The information campaign did not increase pregnancies among teenage couples. …

  4. Education, HIV, and early fertility: experimental evidence from Kenya

    We provide experimental evidence on the relationships between education, HIV/AIDS education, risky behavior and early fertility in Kenya. We exploit randomly assigned variation in the cost of schooling and in exposure to the national HIV/AIDS prevention curriculum for a cohort of over 19,000 adolescents in Western Kenya, originally aged 13.5 on average. We collected data on the schooling, marriage, and fertility out-comes of these students over 7 years, and tested them for HIV and Herpes (HSV2) after 7 years. …

  5. Do teenagers respond to HIV risk information? Evidence from a field experiment in Kenya

    We use a randomized experiment to test whether and what information changes teenagers' sexual behavior in Kenya. Providing information on the relative risk of HIV infection by partner's age led to a 28 percent decrease in teen pregnancy, an objective proxy for the incidence of unprotected sex. Self-reported sexual behavior data suggests substitution away from older (riskier) partners and toward same-age partners. In contrast, the official abstinence-only HIV curriculum had no impact on teen pregnancy. …

  6. Finding our voices. Gender and sexual identities and HIV/AIDS in education

    Of the 8,600,000 young people living with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa, 67 percent are young women and 33 percent are young men (Young People and HIV/AIDS: Opportunity in Crisis, UNICEF, UNAIDS, WHO, 2001). The Girls' Education Programme recognises 'gender' as the features associated in specific cultures with masculinity and femininity, and acknowledges that not all societies and cultures share the same ideas of what it means to be male or female. …

Our mission

Supporting education ministries, researchers and practitioners through a comprehensive database, website and information service.