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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. It's good to teach them, but … they should also know when to apply it: parents’ views and attitudes towards Fiji's Family Life Education curriculum

    A Family Life Education (FLE) curriculum was introduced in Fiji schools in 2010 in response to concern about increasing teenage pregnancies and young people's vulnerability to sexually transmitted infections and other health and social problems. However, conservative and suspicious parental attitudes towards FLE have been an obstacle. The need for an educational programme for parents to complement the FLE curriculum taught in schools is now urgent. This study examines parents' views on the sex and sexuality component of the FLE curriculum. …

  2. Sexuality education in New Zealand: What adolescents are being taught and what they really want to know

    Sexuality education is the only subject in New Zealand schools which requires parents to be consulted on the content. Since it is associated with moral and social issues, it is a controversial topic. However, what has been notably missing from the debate is the voice of those most immediately concerned with the outcome— the adolescent.

  3. Evaluating the need for sex education in developing countries: sexual behaviour, knowledge of preventing sexually transmitted infections/HIV and unplanned pregnancy

    The document is an article called "Evaluating the need for sex education in developing countries: sexual behaviour, knowledge of preventing sexually transmitted infections/HIV and unplanned pregnancy" and published in the review "Sex education" in November 2005. It was written by Susheela Singh, Akinrinola Bankole and Vanessa Woog. …

  4. The potential of comprehensive sex education in China: findings from Suburban Shanghai

    This study examines the impact of a comprehensive sex education program carried out in a Shanghai suburb with unmarried 15-24 year-olds over a period of 20 months. Though participation in the intervention was not associated with delayed sexual initiation, it was associated with increased odds of contraceptive use and condom use, and with decreased odds of sexual coercion during the intervention period. Additionally, the proportion of youth reporting pregnancy involvement during the intervention period was significantly lower in the intervention group than among controls.

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