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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Impact of the provision of school lunch on attendance in remote rural Jamaican primary schools

    This study examined the attendance patterns by region of schools which participated in School Feeding Programmes (SFPs) in poor, remote rural areas of Jamaica and determined wether there was a significant difference in attendance over a 10 year period between children who took different lunch types. The study revealed peaks and troughs in the average annual attendance by region, but found no significant difference in attendance by lunch type. …

  2. HIV-related discrimination among grade six students in nine southern African countries

    Background: HIV-related stigmatisation and discrimination by young children towards their peers have important consequences at the individual level and for our response to the epidemic, yet research on this area is limited. Methods: We used nationally representative data to examine discrimination of HIV-positive children by grade six students (n = 39,664) across nine countries in Southern Africa: Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe. …

  3. Situation analysis. A summary of school health in India and in four states: Andhra Pradesh, Delhi, Gujarat and Tamil Nadu

    This rapid situation analysis examines the national and selected States’ pictures of SHN and was conducted taking the internationally agreed pillars of FRESH into consideration and using mixed methods of literature review, secondary data analysis, and primary qualitative data analysis from key informant interviews with both national and State-level SHN practitioners and policymakers. …

  4. The girl with her period is the one to hang her head. Reflections on menstrual management among schoolgirls in rural Kenya

    Background. The onset of menstruation is a landmark event in the life of a young woman. Yet the complications and challenges that can accompany such an event have been understudied, specifically in resource-poor settings. As interventions aim to improve female attendance in schools, it is important to explore how menstruation is perceived and navigated by girls in the school setting. This research conveys rural Kenyan schoolgirls' perceptions and practices related to menstruation. Methods. Data were collected at six rural schools in the Nyanza Province of Western Kenya. …

  5. Factors shaping the HIV-competence of two primary schools in rural Zimbabwe

    We present multi-method case studies of two Zimbabwean primary schools – one rural and one small-town. The rural school scored higher than the small-town school on measures of child well-being and school attendance by HIV-affected children. The small-town school had superior facilities, more teachers with higher morale, more specialist HIV/AIDS activities, and an explicit religious ethos. The relatively impoverished rural school was located in a more cohesive community with a more critically conscious, dynamic and networking headmaster. …

  6. A life-skills-based HIV/AIDS prevention education for rural students of primary schools in China: What changed? What have we learned?

    Objective: To evaluate a four-hour life-skills-based HIV/AIDS prevention curriculum among 5th grade students in rural primary schools of Hainan province. Methods: The study included two stages. Stage one (September 2006-May 2007) was a pre-post-quasi experimental design; a total of 2 413 students aged 9 to 14 years from fifth grade classes of nine primary schools completed a baseline survey (1 720 students were in the intervention group, 693 in the control group), and over 98% of them took part in a short survey. The experimental curriculum was provided to the intervention group. …

  7. Combat for gender equality in education: rural livelihood pathways in the context of HIV/AIDS

    This book, which was originally written as a dissertation, broadens the approach to gender equality in primary education by exploring the magnitude of complex interactions between schools and rural livelihood household processes in the context of HIV/AIDS. The arguments are based on recent ethnographic research using dimensions of rural pupils', parents', and teachers' responses to the socio-economic impact of HIV/AIDS on their livelihoods. It gives insight into some of the current debates that have been generated in the field of education, HIV/AIDS and rural livelihoods.

  8. HIV/AIDS and primary school performance in Tanzania

    The authors examine the performance of the primary school education system in Tanzania over the 1990s. Given the relatively robust correlation between educational attainment and productivity established in the literature in both agricultural and non-agricultural sectors, human capital accumulation through education forms a major component of development strategy. At the same time, AIDS poses clear threats to the goal of human capital accumulation through education. …

  9. Factors influencing access and retention in primary schooling for children and young people affected by HIV and AIDS: Case studies from rural Malawi

    This report presents findings from the second phase of the SOFIE research project. The research focuses on young people affected by HIV and AIDS and aims to improve their access to learning and increase retention through the use of ODFL strategies that complement and enrich conventional schooling.

  10. A development strategy to empower rural farmers and prevent HIV: Farmer Life Schools

    The report documents an effort of UNDP South East Asia HIV and Development Project in collaboration of FAO and the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) to mainstream HIV resilience building in the agricultural sector through an experiment called Farmer Life Schools (FLS). The FLS approach translates farmers' analytical thinking from plant ecosystem-base into analysing an individual's life as a human ecosystem - with factors that strengthen or weaken his/her resilience to adversities, which includes HIV.

  11. Working-age adult mortality and primary school attendance in rural Kenya

    The rapid increase in adult mortality due to the AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa raises great concern about potential intergenerational effects on children. This article estimates the impact of AIDS-related adult mortality on primary school attendance in rural Kenya using a panel of 1,266 households surveyed in 1997, 2000, and 2002. The paper distinguishes between effects on boys' and girls' education to understand potential gender differences resulting from adult mortality. We also estimate how adult mortality affects child schooling before as well as after the death occurs. …

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