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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Impact of the provision of school lunch on attendance in remote rural Jamaican primary schools

    This study examined the attendance patterns by region of schools which participated in School Feeding Programmes (SFPs) in poor, remote rural areas of Jamaica and determined wether there was a significant difference in attendance over a 10 year period between children who took different lunch types. The study revealed peaks and troughs in the average annual attendance by region, but found no significant difference in attendance by lunch type. …

  2. HIV-related discrimination among grade six students in nine southern African countries

    Background: HIV-related stigmatisation and discrimination by young children towards their peers have important consequences at the individual level and for our response to the epidemic, yet research on this area is limited. Methods: We used nationally representative data to examine discrimination of HIV-positive children by grade six students (n = 39,664) across nine countries in Southern Africa: Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe. …

  3. The girl with her period is the one to hang her head. Reflections on menstrual management among schoolgirls in rural Kenya

    Background. The onset of menstruation is a landmark event in the life of a young woman. Yet the complications and challenges that can accompany such an event have been understudied, specifically in resource-poor settings. As interventions aim to improve female attendance in schools, it is important to explore how menstruation is perceived and navigated by girls in the school setting. This research conveys rural Kenyan schoolgirls' perceptions and practices related to menstruation. Methods. Data were collected at six rural schools in the Nyanza Province of Western Kenya. …

  4. Factors shaping the HIV-competence of two primary schools in rural Zimbabwe

    We present multi-method case studies of two Zimbabwean primary schools – one rural and one small-town. The rural school scored higher than the small-town school on measures of child well-being and school attendance by HIV-affected children. The small-town school had superior facilities, more teachers with higher morale, more specialist HIV/AIDS activities, and an explicit religious ethos. The relatively impoverished rural school was located in a more cohesive community with a more critically conscious, dynamic and networking headmaster. …

  5. A life-skills-based HIV/AIDS prevention education for rural students of primary schools in China: What changed? What have we learned?

    Objective: To evaluate a four-hour life-skills-based HIV/AIDS prevention curriculum among 5th grade students in rural primary schools of Hainan province. Methods: The study included two stages. Stage one (September 2006-May 2007) was a pre-post-quasi experimental design; a total of 2 413 students aged 9 to 14 years from fifth grade classes of nine primary schools completed a baseline survey (1 720 students were in the intervention group, 693 in the control group), and over 98% of them took part in a short survey. The experimental curriculum was provided to the intervention group. …

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