• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 16 results in 0.019 seconds.

Search results

  1. Sexuality education in rural Lesotho schools: challenges and possibilities

    The aim of this paper is to present and discuss some of the obstacles to effective sexuality education in rural Lesotho schools and offer some suggestions that could facilitate positive change in the current status of sexuality education. The call for education as a ‘vaccine’ against new HIV infections places teachers at the forefront of the fight against the pandemic, and thus it is imperative to understand how they experience teaching about sexuality. …

  2. HIV-related discrimination among grade six students in nine southern African countries

    Background: HIV-related stigmatisation and discrimination by young children towards their peers have important consequences at the individual level and for our response to the epidemic, yet research on this area is limited. Methods: We used nationally representative data to examine discrimination of HIV-positive children by grade six students (n = 39,664) across nine countries in Southern Africa: Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe. …

  3. Implementation of adolescent-friendly voluntary medical male circumcision using a school based recruitment program in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Background: Epidemiological data from South Africa demonstrate that risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in males increases dramatically after adolescence. Targeting adolescent HIV-negative males may be an efficient and cost-effective means of maximising the established HIV prevention benefits of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) in high HIV prevalence–, low circumcision practice–settings. This study assessed the feasibility of recruiting male high school students for VMMC in such a setting in rural KwaZulu-Natal. …

  4. Children’s representations of school support for HIV-affected peers in rural Zimbabwe

    Background: HIV has left many African children caring for sick relatives, orphaned or themselves HIV-positive, often facing immense challenges in the absence of significant support from adults. With reductions in development funding, public sector budgetary constraints, and a growing emphasis on the importance of indigenous resources in the HIV response, international policy allocates schools a key role in ‘substituting for families’ (Ansell, 2008) in supporting child health and well-being. …

  5. What can a teacher do with a cellphone? Using participatory visual research to speak back in addressing HIV and AIDS

    The ubiquity of cellphones in South Africa, a country ravaged by HIV and AIDS, makes cellphones an easily accessible tool to use in participatory approaches to addressing HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome) issues, particularly in school contexts. In this article we explore a participatory visual approach undertaken with a group of rural teachers, to uncover and address HIV and AIDS related issues. Drawing on our experience in using participatory video, we used cellphones to produce cellphilms about youth and risk in the context of HIV and AIDS. …

  6. Effectiveness of a school-based AIDS education program among rural students in HIV high epidemic area of China

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a life-planning skills training program using participatory methods among rural senior high school students in Shangcai County, Henan Province, China. Methods: The study was a quasi-experimental study conducted in three Shangcai County senior high schools with comparable socioculture–economic and demographic characteristics (two interventions and one control). …

  7. The provision of a health promoting environment for HIV/AIDS education: the case of Namibian senior secondary schools

    HIV/AIDS programmes in schools ultimately intend to decrease high risk sexual behaviour. One factor facilitating this outcome is a strong health promoting environment in the school. This paper reports a study surveying the health promoting environments supporting HIV/AIDS education in Namibian senior secondary schools. It develops a two dimensional model for classifying the strength of a school’s health promoting environment. The findings show that schools have different strengths of health promoting environments linked more to their size than to a rural or urban location. …

  8. Cash transfers in an epidemic context: the interaction of formal and informal support in rural Malawi

    This paper investigates the short-run consumption expenditure dynamics and the interaction of public and private arrangements of ultra-poor and labor-constrained households in Malawi using an original dataset from the Mchinjii social cash transfer pilot project (one of the first experiments of social protection policies based on unconditional cash transfers in Sub-Saharan Africa). …

  9. Adolescent sexual and reproductive health in Malawi: a synthesis of research evidence

    The primary goal of this report is to summarize what is known about adolescent sexual and reproductive health in Malawi and to identify knowledge and program gaps requiring further research and program action. …

  10. Combat for gender equality in education: rural livelihood pathways in the context of HIV/AIDS

    This book, which was originally written as a dissertation, broadens the approach to gender equality in primary education by exploring the magnitude of complex interactions between schools and rural livelihood household processes in the context of HIV/AIDS. The arguments are based on recent ethnographic research using dimensions of rural pupils', parents', and teachers' responses to the socio-economic impact of HIV/AIDS on their livelihoods. It gives insight into some of the current debates that have been generated in the field of education, HIV/AIDS and rural livelihoods.

  11. Evaluation of a comprehensive school-based AIDS education programme in rural Masaka, Uganda

    This study aimed to evaluate a one-year, comprehensive, school-based HIV and AIDS education program in rural, southwestern Uganda. Twenty intervention schools (1274 students) and 11 control schools (803 students) completed baseline and follow-up questionnaires. Twelve focus groups were conducted among five of the intervention schools (93 students). Very few effects of the intervention were observed. Focus group data indicates that programmes were not implemented comprehensively and certain activities (how to use condoms, role playing) were only superficially used. …

  12. Teachers for rural schools: experiences in Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania and Uganda

    Much is going well with the effort to provide universal primary education in Sub-Saharan Africa. Gross enrollment rates have increased from 78 percent in 1998/99 to 91 percent in 2002/03; sizable investments have greatly improved school infrastructure and access; and large numbers of new teachers have been recruited. But educating the children in remote rural areas continues to be a challenge. Schools in hard-to-reach locations find it difficult to attract and retain teachers. …

  13. HIV/AIDS and primary school performance in Tanzania

    The authors examine the performance of the primary school education system in Tanzania over the 1990s. Given the relatively robust correlation between educational attainment and productivity established in the literature in both agricultural and non-agricultural sectors, human capital accumulation through education forms a major component of development strategy. At the same time, AIDS poses clear threats to the goal of human capital accumulation through education. …

  14. Evaluation of a school-based sexual and reproductive health education intervention among adolescents in rural Bangladesh

    This article is based on a school-based intervention which was undertaken to improve knowledge about reproduction, fertility, and contraception among adolescents in Bangladesh. The study was carried out from February 2001 to September 2002. The objective of the study was to determine the ffectiveness of school-based intervention which combined community sensitization with the distribution of three booklets addressing 1) puberty, 2) fertility and family planning, and 3) STDs/AIDS. …

  15. Working-age adult mortality and primary school attendance in rural Kenya

    The rapid increase in adult mortality due to the AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa raises great concern about potential intergenerational effects on children. This article estimates the impact of AIDS-related adult mortality on primary school attendance in rural Kenya using a panel of 1,266 households surveyed in 1997, 2000, and 2002. The paper distinguishes between effects on boys' and girls' education to understand potential gender differences resulting from adult mortality. We also estimate how adult mortality affects child schooling before as well as after the death occurs. …

Pages

Our mission

Supporting education ministries, researchers and practitioners through a comprehensive database, website and information service.