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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. School health matters beyond 2015: Focussing Resources on Effective School Health (FRESH)

    A joint statement from the Coordinating Group of the professionals and organizations involved in promoting school health and development through the global framework FRESH.

  2. School health minimum package

    A comprehensive, holistic approach encourages each school to look at its whole school community and develop an environment and culture that promote healthy ways of living. A Comprehensive School Health framework combines four main elements: Health Education, Health and Support Services, Social Support and the Physical Environment. It involves the active participation of all members of the school community in creating action plans that make their school a healthier place. …

  3. Meeting the sexual and reproductive health needs of adolescents in school-based health centers

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) are an important source of medical care for low-income and uninsured adolescents, and are a promising way of addressing unintended pregnancy and STIs. Controversy over teens and sex has had a significant impact on the provision of sexual and reproductive health services, and many SBHCs remain limited in their ability to meet the needs of adolescents by dispensing contraceptives on-site. Many SBHCs have overcome challenges and successfully integrated sexual and reproductive health services with other medical care. They can serve as models for other SBHCs.

  4. School-linked sexual health services for young people (SSHYP): a survey and systematic review concerning current models, effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and research opportunities

    The aims of this study were, first, to identify current forms of school-based sexual health services (SBSHS) and school-linked sexual health services (SLSHS) in the UK; second, to review and synthesise existing evidence from qualitative and quantitative studies concerning the effectiveness, acceptability and cost-effectiveness of these types of service, and third, to identify potential areas for further research. The study had two components. …

  5. Inclusive school health and nutrition programmes: a roadmap for mainstreaming disability into the FRESH agenda

    Integrating disability in the post 2015 development agenda is part of a broader strategy for achieving equity. Inclusive approaches to education and health are required to ensure equal rights and opportunities, personal autonomy and dignity to all children, regardless of their social status, gender, age, physical or mental condition, race, religion or sexual orientation. The purpose of this document is to support the implementation of comprehensive school health and nutrition programmes (SHNP) that are inclusive of children with disabilities. …

  6. Best practices for youth-friendly sexual and reproductive health services in schools

    This document provides recommendations for school nurses and health center staff on nine essential components of youth-friendly services – confidentiality, respectful treatment, integrated services, culturally appropriate care, easy access to care, free or low cost services, reproductive and sexual health care, services for young men, and promoting parent-child communication.

  7. The World Health Organization’s Health Promoting Schools framework: a Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis

    Background: Healthy children achieve better educational outcomes which, in turn, are associated with improved health later in life. The World Health Organization’s Health Promoting Schools (HPS) framework is a holistic approach to promoting health and educational attainment in school. The effectiveness of this approach has not yet been rigorously reviewed. Methods: We searched 20 health, education and social science databases, and trials registries and relevant websites in 2011 and 2013. We included cluster randomised controlled trials. …

  8. WASH in schools empowers girls’ education. Proceedings of the Menstrual Hygiene Management in Schools Virtual Conference 2012

    WASH in Schools (WinS) fosters social inclusion and individual self-respect. By offering an alternative to the stigma and marginalization associated with hygiene issues, it empowers all students – and especially encourages girls and female teachers. In recognition of the positive impact on girls’ school attendance and achievement, initiatives around the world are addressing adolescent girls’ menstrual hygiene management (MHM) needs through WinS programming. …

  9. School health and nutrition: Teacher's guide

    This guide for promoting SHN is intended to: Provide information on the SHN Programme and how to establish a Health Promoting School; Provide basic information and procedures on the drugs for treatment of intestinal worms, bilharzia and micronutrient supplements like Vitamin A and Iron; Provide the knowledge and skills in the use of the bilharzia questionnaire, tablet pole, SHN card, monitoring tool, treatment forms, drug request and retirement forms: Provide basic information on school community partnership and how to develop action plans to promote SHN; Assist teachers in treating at least 7 …

  10. Promoting health in schools: from evidence to action

    This document complements the recommendations to establish and sustain health promotion in schools set out in the Guidelines to Promote Health in Schools document. It is an advocacy document for the health and education sectors to undertake school health promotion activities based on the evidence of effectiveness. The document provides succinct evidence-based arguments to support the need for school health promotion and advocates for a whole school (Health Promoting Schools) approach to strategically plan and implement school health initiatives. …

  11. Monitoring and evaluation of school-based health and nutrition programmes: A participative review

    Over the past two decades, many governments and organizations have renewed efforts to develop more effective school-based health and nutrition programmes in low income countries. In large part, this has resulted from the growing body of evidence linking children’s health and education; and the impact of school health and nutrition (SHN) programmes on improving these outcomes and contributing to Education for All (EFA) and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). …

  12. FRESH: a comprehensive school health approach to achieve EFA

    At the dawn of the 21st century, the learning potential of children and young people in every country in the world is compromised b y conditions and behaviours that undermine the physical and emotional well-being that makes learning possible. Hunger, malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies, malaria, polio and intestinal infections, drug and alcohol abuse, violence and injury, unplanned pregnancy and infection with HIV and other sexually transmitted infections threaten the health and lives of the children and youth in which Education for All efforts are most invested. …

  13. Sanitation and Education

    One in five children worldwide does not complete upper-primary school, with particularly high drop-out rates among pubescent-age girls that may limit economic opportunities and perpetuate gender inequality. This paper tests whether educational attainment is stymied by endemically inadequate school sanitation that threatens children's health, privacy, and safety. …

  14. School health and nutrition in Sri Lanka

    In this paper, the policy platform is documented as well as the type, coverage and the effect of the school health and nutrition interventions, followed by the key areas identified for development and learning of the School Health Promotion Program (SHPP). Five priority areas have also been identified for the SHPP to invest in, so as to further integrate school health into national education policies and plans: 1. …

  15. Achieving health promoting schools: Guidelines for promoting health in schools

    A considerable body of evidence has emerged in the last twenty years to inform governments, schools, non-government organisations (NGO’s), teachers, parents and students about effective school health programmes. School programmes that are integrated, holistic and strategic are more likely to produce better health and education outcomes than those which are mainly information-based and implemented only in the classroom. These Guidelines for Promoting Health in Schools identify the basic principles and components of this approach. …

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