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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Promotion of healthy lifestyles in primary schools

    This circular focuses on the importance of physical activity and healthy eating. It is acknowledged that mental and psychological well-being are a key part of healthy lifestyles. Schools support these through their work on anti-bullying and the SPHE curriculum. Schools and the wider education sector have a vital role to play in contributing to the ‘Healthy Ireland’ agenda that is being led by the Department of Health and is supported by the Department of Education and Skills and other Government Departments. …

  2. Legal highs (novel psychoactive substances)

    This briefing paper is part of a series produced by the Drug Education Forum, for schools and others involved in drug education or informal drug prevention. There are many legal drugs which people take in order to change the way they feel, think or behave, or fight illness or disease. Common examples include alcohol, tobacco, caffeine and over-the-counter and prescribed medicines. Learning about all such drugs is a core part of drug education in schools. …

  3. Learning from life skills programmes in drug education

    This briefing paper is part of a series produced by the Drug Education Forum, for schools and others involved in drug education or informal drug prevention. Life skills education is an interactive process of teaching and learning, which is being adopted around the world as a means to empower young people in challenging situations and is the recommended approach to children and young people’s personal, social and health development within formal and informal education settings. …

  4. Engaging parents in drug education in schools and in the community

    This briefing paper is part of a series produced by the Drug Education Forum, for schools and others involved in drug education or informal drug prevention. Parents have a strong influence over young people’s decisions regarding drugs and alcohol, perhaps more than they realise. …

  5. Beyond the lesson plan: drug prevention and early intervention

    Schools have a duty to promote children and young people’s wellbeing, and are also required to promote pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development. As part of this they have a responsibility to help young people manage risk, reducing the likelihood they may be harmed by use of legal and illegal drugs. Good drug education is a significant part of this, but what may be overlooked is the impact that schools (and other services) can have beyond this by providing a supportive environment for young people. …

  6. Principles for supporting school drug education

    This briefing paper is part of a series produced by the Drug Education Forum, for schools and others involved in drug education or informal drug prevention. Recent research carried out by researchers at Hallam Sheffield University found that over half of secondary schools and a third of primary schools work in partnership with at least one external provider to deliver drug education. …

  7. The principles of good drug education

    This briefing paper is part of a series produced by the Drug Education Forum, for schools and others involved in drug education or informal drug prevention. Choosing the best approach to drug education is a key task for educators. This document aims to help understand the principles that lie at the heart of good practice; those that follow have been adapted from the latest best-practice evaluations carried out in the UK, Canada, Australia, the USA, by the United Nations and in other countries.

  8. Guidelines for developing a school substance use policy

    The National Drugs Strategy 2001-2008 sets out a detailed programme of action to be implemented by Government Departments and Agencies to combat the very serious problem of drug misuse in our society. The strategy highlights the important contribution that schools can make in the area of education and prevention, and requires them to have substance use policies in place. The central objective of a school’s substance use policy is the welfare, care and protection of every young person in line with the Education Act, 1998 and the Education (Welfare) Act, 2000. …

  9. Quality standards for effective alcohol and drug education

    Alcohol and drug education is a statutory part of the science curriculum for schools in England, and this can be built on through the Personal Social and Health Education (PSHE) curriculum. By building pupils’ resilience, values and skills around alcohol and drugs, teachers help young people to develop the life skills to enter adulthood healthy and avoiding harms. These standards are designed to help schools and those that work with schools to shape the context and delivery of alcohol and drug education. …

  10. National policy: tackling substance abuse

    The overall aim of these procedures is to protect students from substance abuse in schools. In particular they aim: - To provide educational and care personnel with a practical tool that enables them to intervene in an appropriate manner when substance is found or used in schools. …

  11. A whole school approach to a healthy lifestyle: healthy eating and physical activity policy

    The Whole School Approach to Healthy Lifestyle: Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Policy aims to: - Give high priority to healthy eating and physical activity through holistic education. - Strengthen the necessary framework and support an enabling school environment to help the whole school community to adopt healthier patterns of living by encouraging physical activity, promoting healthy foods and limiting the availability of products high in salt, sugar and fats. …

  12. Schools (Health Promotion and Nutrition) Scotland Act: health promotion guidance for local authorities and schools

    This guidance has been devised to support local authorities and schools, and managers of grant-aided schools, in working with partner agencies to meet the duty to ensure that all schools are health promoting. The guidance provides signposting to the policy framework that is already in place. While this guidance is aimed at local authorities and their schools, and managers of grant-aided schools, it will be of interest to all partners involved in aspects of health promotion for the benefit of children and young people. …

  13. The link between pupil health and wellbeing and attainment: A briefing for head teachers, governors and staff in education settings

    Research evidence shows that education and health are closely linked. So promoting the health and wellbeing of pupils and students within schools and colleges has the potential to improve their educational outcomes and their health and wellbeing outcomes. This briefing draws on a rapid review approach that provides a broad, succinct scope of the scientific evidence. The complexity of the interrelationships between outcomes makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions about causality. …

  14. Drug prevention programmes in schools: what is the evidence?

    Key messages: Universal drug education programmes in schools have been shown to have an impact on the most common substances used by young people: alcohol, tobacco and cannabis. The approaches which appear to be most effective are those based on social influences and life skills, for example Life Skills Training and Unplugged. Interventions which are not drug-specific but focus on children and young people’s attachment to school can also be effective in reducing substance misuse. The Good Behaviour Game is one example of these. …

  15. Drug education: an entitlement for all a report to government by the advisory group on drug and alcohol education

    Drug And Alcohol Advisory Group – Key Recommendations - Increase parents’ and carers’ knowledge and skills about drug and alcohol education and prevention enabling them to better inform and protect their children; - Improve the quality of drug and alcohol education by making PSHE a statutory subject – to enable schools and colleges to promote well-being effectively, and to improve the quality of training for PSHE teachers; and - Improve identification and support for young people vulnerable to drug misuse in schools, colleges and non-formal settings.

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