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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. School-based relationships and sexuality education (RSE): lessons for policy and practice

    There is clear evidence that school-based sex education programmes can improve sexual health outcomes. Women who have experienced sex education in schools are less likely to have experienced rape, abortion or distress about sex. Many factors combine to affect health and sex education will not override the determinants of health in general. …

  2. Informing the future of the sex and relationships education curriculum in Wales

    The report supports the recommendations of the Sex and Relationships Education Expert Panel which was presented to the Cabinet Secretary for Education on 13 December 2017. …

  3. HIV and education: Guaranteeing lessons for all. Research into the provision of relationships and sexual health education in Scotland

    There is now consensus among Scotland's third sector children's rights, women's rights and young people's and equality organisations that RSHP lessons urgently need to be improved. Comprehensive sexuality education is essential for young people to be able to protect themselves from unwanted pregnancy, HIV and sexually transmitted infections, to Evidence emonstrates that young gay and bisexual men in Scotland are at higher risk of HIV as a consequence of having poor knowledge about HIV risk. …

  4. What do young people think about their school-based sex and relationship education? A qualitative synthesis of young people’s views and experiences

    Objectives: Although sex and relationship education (SRE) represents a key strand in policies to safeguard young people and improve their sexual health, it currently lacks statutory status, government guidance is outdated and a third of UK schools has poor-quality SRE. We aimed to investigate whether current provision meets young people's needs. Design: Synthesis of qualitative studies of young people's views of their school-based SRE. Setting: Eligible studies originated from the UK, Ireland, the USA, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Japan, Iran, Brazil and Sweden. …

  5. Healthy, happy, safe: an investigation into how PSHE and SRE are inspected in English schools

    This report analyses over 2000 primary and secondary school inspection reports for 2015/16. The report’s main findings are as follows: -SRE was mentioned by inspectors in less than 1% of reports and PSHE in just 14% of reports, fewer than almost all other established subjects, including history (36%), geography (26%), music (31%), and art (31%). -Mentions of sexual health, safe sex, and related topics were almost entirely absent from inspectors’ reports, with only 1% of reports referring to these issues. …

  6. Impact and cost-effectiveness analysis of the national school-based sexuality education programme in Estonia

    Policy-makers making decisions on the implementation of school-based sexuality education (SE) programmes face two important questions: (1) what are the costs of implementing and scaling up SE programmes, and (2) what are the impacts? This paper responds to these questions by retrospectively assessing costs, impact and cost-effectiveness of the national school-based SE programme in Estonia 1997–2009. The three-year curriculum had been taught to 190,000 students at the end of 2009. The cost of reaching one student was USD 32.90 and the total costs were USD 5.6 million. …

  7. Situation analysis: sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of adolescents in Cyprus

    The purpose of this document is to provide the most up to date scientific information on the Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) of adolescents in Cyprus, in order to highlight the necessity for mandatory Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) at all levels of school education. SRHR is a general term, which we break down into specific areas so that the most recent data for each area can be given. This document is structured in a way that illuminates relationships between specific outcomes of SRHR and factors that affect those outcomes. …

  8. Comprehensive sexuality education: the challenges and opportunities of scaling-up

    This publication is part of an ongoing programme of work initiated by UNESCO in 2008 to provide technical guidance and implementation support for sexuality education programmes, as a platform for HIV prevention, treatment and care. It emphasizes the challenges and opportunities for scaling up comprehensive sexuality education in school settings. Building on indepth interviews with key informants involved in past and ongoing work on sexuality education, this publication provides conceptual and practical guidance on definitions and strategies for scaling-up. …

  9. Comprehensive sexuality education: the challenges and opportunities of scaling-up

    This report builds on a programme of work on sexuality education for young people initiated in 2008 by UNESCO. It is also informed by several other past and ongoing initiatives related to scaling up sexuality education, as well as drawing on case studies presented at the Bogota international consultation on sexuality education, convened by UNFPA in 2010. The report emphasizes the challenges for scaling-up in terms of integrating comprehensive sexuality education into the formal curricula of schools. …

  10. Valuing visibilty: an exploration of how sexual orientation issues arise and are addressed in post-primary schools

    ‘Valuing Visibility: An Exploration of How Issues of Sexual Orientation Arise and Are Addressed in Post-primary Schools’ is a research project funded by the Department of Education & Science and is being undertaken by the Education Department, NUI Maynooth in partnership with GLEN – Gay and Lesbian Equality Network. The research project seeks to document positive inclusive practice being carried out by schools with a view to informing the work of the key education stakeholders in making schools safe and inclusive learning environments for lesbian, gay and bisexual students. …

  11. SRE are you getting it? A report by the UK Youth Parliament

    SRE in schools is and has been of concern to young people to UKYP's knowledge, for at least seven years. Since UKYP's first Manifesto in 2001, Members of the Youth Parliament (MYPs) have consistently said that the SRE they are receiving in school is too little, too late, too biological and doesn't provide enough (if any) information on relationships. The Government is not listening to the views of children and young people receiving SRE. OFSTED in, 'Time For Change? …

  12. Sex and relationships education in other countries

    In November 2009, the NFER's International Information Unit (comprising the Eurydice Unit for England, Wales and Northern Ireland1 and the team responsible for the International Review of Curriculum and Assessment Frameworks Internet Archive - INCA) completed some desk research on the ways in which sex and relationships education is provided in a number of countries worldwide. This aimed to answer the following questions: What is taught about sex and relationships education, and to what age group? Which elements of this are compulsory? …

  13. Sex and relationship education: views from teachers, parents and governors

    Almost 1,500 school leaders, school governors and parents of school-aged children were asked for their views on the current provision of SRE and how the topic should be delivered in future. Key findings. There was a very high level of agreement between parents, school leaders and governors about SRE provision. More than nine out of 10 parents, and approximately eight out of 10 school leaders and governors agreed that it was 'very important' for children to receive information on practising safer sex and always using contraception. …

  14. Love only after classes: needs assessment on sexuality education in Macedonia

    In Macedonia there is a need for introducing sexuality education in schools. This finding is a result of a research determining the needs of the parents, teachers and students, and reviewing the current school curricula. Both parents and teachers agree on the introduction of sexuality education as a regular subject in schools. Such subject, among others, must develop the practical skills for protection from risks related to sexual activity. …

  15. Addressing homophobic bullying in second-level schools

    Irish legislation and educational policy guidance requires schools to promote equality of access to and participation in education. In this context schools are required to address discrimination, harassment and bullying, including homophobic harassment and bullying. However these are relatively recent developments, and much work remains to be done to put in place practical and meaningful responses at school level. The aim of this report and the research contained within it is to assist schools in developing a positive and practical response to homophobic bullying. …

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