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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Mentoring adolescent boys to reduce gender-based violence

    According to the theory of change that underlies the Samata programme, one important factor in keeping girls in school is to reduce gender-based violence by their male peers. This brief explains how Samata works with adolescent boys.

  2. Connect with Respect: Classroom Program for Prevention of Gender-based Violence, Thailand Training Workshop, Bangkok, 11-12 November, 2016

    Connect with Respect: Preventing Gender-based Violence in Schools is a classroom program for preventing school-related gender-based violence (SRGBV) in the context of lower secondary schools. It was designed through a collaboration led by the East Asia and Pacific United Nations Girls Education Initiative (UNGEI) SRGBV working group, with participation from Plan International, UN Women, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). …

  3. Bullying targeting secondary school students who are or are perceived to be transgender or same-sex attracted: types, prevalence, impact, motivation and preventive measures in five provinces of Thailand

    The objectives of the study were as follows: To gather evidence on the nature, scale and impact of bullying targeting students who are or are perceived to be same-sex attracted or transgender, attending general secondary schools in 5 provinces of Thailand; To study various aspects of the lifestyles of secondary school students that might be linked to bullying behaviours; To document the availability of existing prevention and support interventions on bullying targeting students who are or are perceived to be same-sex attracted or transgender, including accountability measures for those perpetr …

  4. Breaking a spell of silence: the Tasmanian evaluation of the 2006 Pride and Prejudice program

    An evaluation of the Pride & Prejudice program, which ran in three Tasmanian schools in 2006, suggests that students who completed the program had more positive attitudes towards gay men and lesbians. This finding parallels an earlier evaluation of the same anti-homophobia program undertaken in Victoria. The evaluation leads to a discussion about the deeper and often hidden purposes of schooling, and about the discursive formations of heteronormativity, which provide a heterosexist basis for ‘curriculum’. …

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