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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Guidelines for inclusive education: sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression

    Evidence from IGLYO’s members as well as research from various countries worldwide has shown a continued need for school systems to implement inclusive policies and activities across Europe. School bullying based on real or perceived sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression – referred to as homophobic and transphobic bullying - constitutes a violation of the human right to education. …

  2. Tackling homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying for disabled children and young people and those with special educational needs: a guide for school staff

    A recent report from NatCen found that schools lack confidence in dealing with homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying, are unsure how to address it and feel under-resourced. Anti-Bullying Alliance (ABA) and Education Action Challenging Homophobia (EACH) are working closely together with schools in urban and rural areas across the West of England: building their capacity to challenge and prevent homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying. …

  3. Guidelines for supporting sexual and gender diversity in schools. Sexuality discrimination and homophobic bullying

    It is a fundamental right of every child and young person to feel safe in their school environment. Western Australian schools pride themselves on being safe and effective learning environments that cater for the diverse needs of all students, including those who are (LGBTI) lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and other sexuality, sex and gender diverse people. Recognising LGBTI students and staff as an everyday part of the social mix of the school community is important in responding appropriately to their needs. …

  4. Visibility without being in the spotlight: Some suggestions for primary schools that want to be open for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender families

    There is an increasing number of “rainbow families”: families where one or both parents or/and co-care takers are lesbian, homosexual, bisexual or transgender. Although the upbringing of children in such rainbow families does not differ from heterosexual families, rainbow families often have to deal with specific challenges. They often get negative or prejudiced comments and questions about their family composition. Parents, their children, but also their environment have to learn how to deal with such events. This makes rainbow families different to some extent. …

  5. Creating a PSHE education policy for your school

    This paper will help you write your school’s PSHE education policy. The best policies are produced collaboratively by the people who will be affected by them and should be consulted on widely. This consultation should include pupils themselves where appropriate. The completed policy will serve a number of purposes: - To people unfamiliar with the school, it publicly defines ‘what we believe and how we do things here’; - For people working in the school it offers a clear framework for teaching, protocols to follow, and a ‘tool’ that helps to shape decision-making.

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