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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Relationship between teachers’ attitude towards teaching HIV/AIDS education and students’ knowledge and attitude towards sexual behaviour in secondary schools in Coast Region, Kenya

    The purpose of the study was to determine the relationship between teachers’ attitude towards teaching HIV/AIDS education and students’ knowledge and attitude towards sexual behaviour in secondary schools in the Coast Region of Kenya. The study used descriptive survey research design. The samples comprised 421 respondents of which 33 were teachers and 388 students in 13 secondary schools. Questionnaires and interview schedule were used to collect the data. The validity of the instruments was checked by the supervisors and other experts in the field of research. …

  2. Education, HIV, and early fertility: experimental evidence from Kenya

    A seven-year randomized evaluation suggests education subsidies reduce adolescent girls’ dropout, pregnancy, and marriage but not sexually transmitted infection (STI). The government’s HIV curriculum, which stresses abstinence until marriage, does not reduce pregnancy or STI. Both programs combined reduce STI more, but cut dropout and pregnancy less, than education subsidies alone. …

  3. Education and risky sex in Africa: Unraveling the link between women’s education and reproductive health behaviors in Kenya

    Much research attention has been devoted to understanding the relationship between education and riskier sex-related behaviors and HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. While in the early 1990s researchers found that increases in education were associated with a higher incidence of HIV/AIDS, this relationship appears to have reversed and better educated people, especially women, appear less likely to engage in riskier sex-related behaviors and have a lower incidence rate of HIV/AIDS. …

  4. Do teenagers respond to HIV risk information? Evidence from a field experiment in Kenya

    We use a randomized experiment to test whether and what information changes teenagers' sexual behavior in Kenya. Providing information on the relative risk of HIV infection by partner's age led to a 28 percent decrease in teen pregnancy, an objective proxy for the incidence of unprotected sex. Self-reported sexual behavior data suggests substitution away from older (riskier) partners and toward same-age partners. In contrast, the official abstinence-only HIV curriculum had no impact on teen pregnancy. …

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