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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Visibility without being in the spotlight: Some suggestions for primary schools that want to be open for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender families

    There is an increasing number of “rainbow families”: families where one or both parents or/and co-care takers are lesbian, homosexual, bisexual or transgender. Although the upbringing of children in such rainbow families does not differ from heterosexual families, rainbow families often have to deal with specific challenges. They often get negative or prejudiced comments and questions about their family composition. Parents, their children, but also their environment have to learn how to deal with such events. This makes rainbow families different to some extent. …

  2. Addressing homophobia in schools: how key stakeholders can ensure safe and inclusive schools. Mexico City Ministerial Declaration - "Educating to Prevent"

    The Mexico City Ministerial Declaration "Educating to Prevent" is a strategic tool to strengthen HIV-prevention efforts in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) by ensuring access to quality, comprehensive sexuality education and sexual and reproductive health services. Moreover, the Declaration also seeks to foster equity among all people and to combat discrimination, including discrimination based on an individual's HIV status, sexual orientation, or gender identity.

  3. I am the hate that dare not speak its name: dealing with homophobia in secondary schools

    This paper describes the outcomes of a small-scale project involving 19 secondary schools. The project investigated how effectively issues of homophobic bullying and sexualities were addressed through secondary schools' formal policies and areas of the curriculum. Outcomes indicate that sexual orientation was mentioned in two-thirds of Equal Opportunities policies but was not mentioned specifically in any Anti-Bullying policies. Staff highlighted the need for training in issues surrounding sexualities, homophobic bullying and clarification of Section 28. …

  4. Writing themselves in 3. The third national study on the sexual health and wellbeing of same sex attracted and gender questioning young people

    Writing Themselves In 3 (WTi3) is the third national study of the sexual health and wellbeing of same sex attracted and gender questioning young people (SSAGQ). The Writing Themselves In reports serve several functions beyond being a strong indicator of the sexual health and wellbeing of SSAGQ young people. They are an indicator of levels of homophobia in Australian schools and other places where young people congregate, and they reveal the effectiveness of the many interventions that aim to make Australia a safer and more inclusive place for these young people. …

  5. Writing themselves in again: 6 years on. The 2nd national report on the sexual health and well-being of same sex attracted young people in Australia

    Writing Themselves In Again - 6 years on: the 2nd national report on the sexuality, health and well-being of same sex attracted young Australians is the follow up report to a similar study conducted in 1998. The aim of the report is to find out whether the many changes in the community have improved the sexual health and well-being of same sex attracted young people (SSAY). In particular the project aimed to: 1. Document the levels of homophobia and discrimination facing SSAY today; 2. Document the impact of homophobia on young people themselves; 3. …

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