• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 21 results in 0.108 seconds.

Search results

  1. "It's not normal": sexual exploitation, harassment and abuse in secondary schools in Senegal

    “It’s not normal” documents how female students are exposed to sexual exploitation, harassment, and abuse in middle and upper secondary schools. Based on interviews and focus group discussions with more than 160 girls and young women, the report documents cases of teachers who abuse their position of authority by sexually harassing girls and engage in sexual relations with them, promising students money, good grades, food, or items such as mobile phones and new clothes. …

  2. Situational analysis on the status of sexual and reproductive health of students and gender-based violence in technical and vocational colleges in Malawi

    UNESCO commissioned a study to conduct a situational analysis on the status of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) of students and gender-based violence (GBV) in technical and vocational colleges (TVCs) in Malawi operating under the Technical, Entrepreneurship and Vocational (TEVET) system. The methodology comprised of a desk review, survey, key informant interviews, and focus group discussions. …

  3. The need to prepare future teachers to understand and combat homophobia in schools

    Teacher training programmes that improve teachers' capacity and confidence to address homophobia in South African schools will engender non-homophobic school contexts. Currently, there is a dearth of educational research on future teachers' preparation for homophobic school contexts. …

  4. A rigorous review of global research evidence on policy and practice on school-related gender-based violence

    This rigorous literature review was commissioned by UNICEF, with the aim of examining research evidence on approaches to addressing school-related gender-based violence (SRGBV). While the scope of the review was global, an emphasis was placed on research in low- and middle-income countries. The review addressed the following questions: 1. What does research evidence tell us about the kinds of policies and practices being used to address SRGBV, and in what contexts, around the world? What concepts and ideas underpin these interventions, and what are the implications for addressing SRGBV? 2. …

  5. Guidelines for inclusive education: sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression

    Evidence from IGLYO’s members as well as research from various countries worldwide has shown a continued need for school systems to implement inclusive policies and activities across Europe. School bullying based on real or perceived sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression – referred to as homophobic and transphobic bullying - constitutes a violation of the human right to education. …

  6. Tackling homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying for disabled children and young people and those with special educational needs: a guide for school staff

    A recent report from NatCen found that schools lack confidence in dealing with homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying, are unsure how to address it and feel under-resourced. Anti-Bullying Alliance (ABA) and Education Action Challenging Homophobia (EACH) are working closely together with schools in urban and rural areas across the West of England: building their capacity to challenge and prevent homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying. …

  7. Tackling homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying among school-age children and young people: findings from a mixed methods study of teachers, other providers and pupils

    This report provides the findings from a qualitative study of ‘What works in tackling homophobic, biphobic and transphobic (HBT) bullying among school-aged children and young people?’. …

  8. Why LGBT issues matter in education

    The author analyzes how three dimensions of the school system: school climate, formal curriculum and teaching practices influence the school experiences of LGBT youth. Rendering schooling more inclusive and less discriminatory implies understanding and taking action on each of these dimensions. The arguments are organized in three angles : Angle 1. The truth about homophobia and gender-based violence in education; Angle 2. LGBT-inclusive education; Angle 3. Teachers dealing with sexual diversity.

  9. Guidelines for supporting sexual and gender diversity in schools. Sexuality discrimination and homophobic bullying

    It is a fundamental right of every child and young person to feel safe in their school environment. Western Australian schools pride themselves on being safe and effective learning environments that cater for the diverse needs of all students, including those who are (LGBTI) lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and other sexuality, sex and gender diverse people. Recognising LGBTI students and staff as an everyday part of the social mix of the school community is important in responding appropriately to their needs. …

  10. Visibility without being in the spotlight: Some suggestions for primary schools that want to be open for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender families

    There is an increasing number of “rainbow families”: families where one or both parents or/and co-care takers are lesbian, homosexual, bisexual or transgender. Although the upbringing of children in such rainbow families does not differ from heterosexual families, rainbow families often have to deal with specific challenges. They often get negative or prejudiced comments and questions about their family composition. Parents, their children, but also their environment have to learn how to deal with such events. This makes rainbow families different to some extent. …

  11. Lesson plans for teaching about sexual and gender diversity in Thailand

    Every student has a right to learn in a safe environment. Yet for students who face bullying and harassment, schools and other educational settings can be fundamentally unsafe places. Bullying can take multiple forms, including: teasing, name-calling and labelling, physical abuse, sexual assault and social exclusion. Bullying not only threatens a child’s right to education, but it undermines other fundamental rights to health, safety, dignity and freedom from discrimination. Bullying occurs at all levels of education, including in primary schools. …

  12. Good policy and practice in HIV and health education. Booklet 8: Education sector responses to homophobic bullying

    This booklet is the eighth in a series of publications that address key themes of UNESCO’s work in HIV and Health Education. It marks the first of several contributions to school-based health promotion that UNESCO will produce to complement our work in HIV and sexuality education. The booklet lays out the context, extent and impact of homophobic bullying and synthesizes lessons learned as well as good policies and practices for an education sector response to homophobic bullying. This booklet is intended mainly for education sector policy-makers, planners and managers. …

  13. Valuing visibilty: an exploration of how sexual orientation issues arise and are addressed in post-primary schools

    ‘Valuing Visibility: An Exploration of How Issues of Sexual Orientation Arise and Are Addressed in Post-primary Schools’ is a research project funded by the Department of Education & Science and is being undertaken by the Education Department, NUI Maynooth in partnership with GLEN – Gay and Lesbian Equality Network. The research project seeks to document positive inclusive practice being carried out by schools with a view to informing the work of the key education stakeholders in making schools safe and inclusive learning environments for lesbian, gay and bisexual students. …

  14. Straight talk: an investigation of attitudes and experiences of homophobic bullying in second-level schools

    The aim of this research was to explore the attitudes and experiences of students, parents, teachers and school principals regarding homophobic bullying in second-level schools. One hundred and twenty five interviews were conducted in five second-level schools in the Greater Dublin Area using a method that reflected a grounded theory approach. Five codes or themes were identified using the data collected from the one to one interviews. …

  15. Addressing homophobic bullying in second-level schools

    Irish legislation and educational policy guidance requires schools to promote equality of access to and participation in education. In this context schools are required to address discrimination, harassment and bullying, including homophobic harassment and bullying. However these are relatively recent developments, and much work remains to be done to put in place practical and meaningful responses at school level. The aim of this report and the research contained within it is to assist schools in developing a positive and practical response to homophobic bullying. …

Pages

Our mission

Supporting education ministries, researchers and practitioners through a comprehensive database, website and information service.