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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. What do young people think about their school-based sex and relationship education? A qualitative synthesis of young people’s views and experiences

    Objectives: Although sex and relationship education (SRE) represents a key strand in policies to safeguard young people and improve their sexual health, it currently lacks statutory status, government guidance is outdated and a third of UK schools has poor-quality SRE. We aimed to investigate whether current provision meets young people's needs. Design: Synthesis of qualitative studies of young people's views of their school-based SRE. Setting: Eligible studies originated from the UK, Ireland, the USA, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Japan, Iran, Brazil and Sweden. …

  2. What is best practice in sex and relationship education? A synthesis of evidence, including stakeholders’ views

    Sex and relationship education (SRE) is regarded as vital to improving young people's sexual health, but a third of schools in England lacks good SRE and government guidance is outdated. The authors aimed to identify what makes SRE programmes effective, acceptable, sustainable and capable of faithful implementation. […] They identified key features of effective and acceptable SRE. Their best practice criteria can be used to evaluate existing programmes, contribute to the development of new programmes and inform consultations around statutory SRE.

  3. Sex and relationships education (SRE) for the 21st century. Supplementary advice to the Sex and Relationship Education Guidance DfEE (0116/2000)

    This new guidance developed by the PSHE Association, Brook, and Sex Education Forum supplements 2000 statutory guidance on SRE. This guidance has been produced to help teachers and schools to provide good Sex and Relationship Education (SRE); to offer additional support on new issues not included within existing guidance; and to provide advice which reflects updated legislation, including the Equality Act 2010. …

  4. Sex and relationships education in further education settings: Investigating training and resources

    This report sets out findings of a research study designed to establish current levels of sex and relationships education (SRE) provision in further education (FE) and sixth form colleges. …

  5. Sex and relationships education in further education settings: Young people with learning disabilities

    This report presents the findings of a research study that made a specific investigation into the SRE needs of young people aged 16 to 19 with learning disabilities. The study comprised four focus groups carried out with young people aged 16 to 19 with learning disabilities. A summary of the views of non-disabled young people consulted (also through focus groups) in the earlier research is included in this report for comparison. …

  6. Sex and relationships education in further education settings: Exploratory research

    The present study is exploratory in nature, examining SRE in FE settings from the perspective of both student service managers (or a comparable person) within colleges as well as students. The authors describe trends in SRE across colleges as well as areas for improvement. More specifically, they examine the following research questions: To what extent is SRE available in FE and sixth form colleges? Which FE students receive SRE? What are the core SRE topic areas for 16-19-year-olds and are these being delivered? What is the format of SRE delivery? …

  7. Sex and relationships education: still not getting any?

    Are you happy with the sex and relationships education you have received? If not, it helps to know what you can do to make a difference in your local area. Read on to learn more about your rights, top tips and other young people like you who have made a difference.

  8. SRE are you getting it? A report by the UK Youth Parliament

    SRE in schools is and has been of concern to young people to UKYP's knowledge, for at least seven years. Since UKYP's first Manifesto in 2001, Members of the Youth Parliament (MYPs) have consistently said that the SRE they are receiving in school is too little, too late, too biological and doesn't provide enough (if any) information on relationships. The Government is not listening to the views of children and young people receiving SRE. OFSTED in, 'Time For Change? …

  9. Key findings: young people's survey on sex and relationships education

    This briefing is a summary of the key findings of an online survey designed to find out from 16- to 25-year-olds what their experience of sex and relationships education (SRE) was at school, what topics they were taught and what made their SRE particularly good or bad. In total 1,709 self-selected young people responded to the survey.

  10. Time for change? Personal, social and health education

    This report evaluates the current PSHE curriculum: whether it is based sufficiently closely on the needs of young people and how the outcomes might be best achieved. It draws on evidence from surveys of PSHE by Her Majesty's Inspectors (HMI) and whole-school inspection reports from the period 2001-06. It also refers to earlier reports which remain relevant. In preparing this report, Ofsted commissioned the Schools Health Education Unit, Exeter, to provide research evidence from its behavioural surveys.

  11. Are you getting it right? A toolkit for consulting young people on sex and relationships education

    This toolkit provides a selection of activities to help secondary schools involve young people when reviewing and auditing their sex and relationships education (SRE).

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