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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Child marriage in West and Central Africa at a glance

    Child marriage in West and Central Africa is one of the biggest challenges in the region and has enormous adverse effects on education, health, including sexual and reproductive health, and on the overall development of adolescents and youth. This brochure provides recent data and analysis of child marriage in the region.

  2. Why addressing child marriage and adolescent pregnancy is essential to achieving the demographic dividend in West and Central Africa: position paper

    This position paper presents several strong arguments about why it is imperative to address child marriage and adolescent pregnancy, if we want to succeed in harnessing the demographic dividend in West and Central Africa. It also provides recommendations on the key actions different stakeholder groups can take to make this a reality.

  3. State of world population 2018: the power of choice: reproductive rights and the demographic transition

    The global trend towards smaller families is a reflection of people making reproductive choices to have as few or as many children as they want, when they want. When people lack choice, it can have a long-term impact on fertility rates, often making them higher or lower than what most people desire.

  4. The revised international technical guidance on sexuality education - a powerful tool at an important crossroads for sexuality education

    In January 2018, UNESCO, together with UNAIDS, UNFPA, UNICEF, UN Women, and the WHO, completed the substantial technical and political process of updating the International Technical Guidance on Sexuality Education, thereby unifying a UN position on rationale, evidence, and guidance on designing and delivering comprehensive sexuality education (CSE).

  5. Why addressing child marriage and adolescent pregnancy is essential to achieving the demographic dividend in West and Central Africa: policy brief

    Girls are subject to child marriage, female genital mutilation and limited education and as such, are denied equality of opportunities. At the beginning of 2016, the African Union Heads of State and Government underlined a commitment to put young people and women first by agreeing to focus on “Harnessing the demographic dividend through investments in youth” throughout 2017 and beyond. UNFPA in West and Central Africa recognizes the critical importance of investing in adolescents and youth, particularly adolescent girls. …

  6. HIV/AIDS vulnerabilities, discrimination, and service accessibility among Africa’s youth: Insights from a multi-country study

    Africa’s young people aged 15–24 are disproportionately affected by HIV and AIDS. The impact of the epidemic on young people calls for close attention to the youth dimensions of the epidemic. To inform the development of more effective policies for targeting youth and meeting their needs, the Population Council and partners conducted a study of HIV risk-taking and health-seeking behaviors among young people in Egypt, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, and Uganda. …

  7. WASH in schools empowers girls’ education. Proceedings of the Menstrual Hygiene Management in Schools Virtual Conference 2012

    WASH in Schools (WinS) fosters social inclusion and individual self-respect. By offering an alternative to the stigma and marginalization associated with hygiene issues, it empowers all students – and especially encourages girls and female teachers. In recognition of the positive impact on girls’ school attendance and achievement, initiatives around the world are addressing adolescent girls’ menstrual hygiene management (MHM) needs through WinS programming. …

  8. In a life: linking HIV and sexual and reproductive health in people’s lives

    IPPF’s comprehensive response to HIV is situated within a wider sexual and reproductive health framework. It links prevention with treatment, care and support; reduces HIV-related stigma and discrimination; and responds to the unique regional and national characteristics of the HIV epidemic. These real-life testimonies highlight how our work – shaped and pioneered by the efforts of thousands of committed staff, volunteers and partners – makes the vital links between HIV, sexual and reproductive health and rights.

  9. What they really want to know. Developing booklets for young people on growing up and sexuality

    A large proportion of young people worldwide are sexually active, and this exposes them to the risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, and to the risk of unintended pregnancies. In 2008, 16 million girls aged 15 to 19 gave birth and approximately 40% of these pregnancies were unintended. Young people between the ages of 15 and 24 years account for more than one third of all new HIV infections, with some 3,000 young people becoming infected with HIV each day. …

  10. Status report adolescents and young people in sub-Saharan Africa: Opportunities and challenges

    Nearly half of the world's population, some 3 billion people, is under the age of 25. As the largest generation ever of young people, investments in their health and well-being are crucial so they can make a positive transition into adulthood and fully contribute to the economic and social development of their families, communities and nations. But in order to develop strategies and mobilize financial resources to support adolescent and youth development, decisionmakers need reliable, up-to-date demographic, health, education and socioeconomic data about young people. …

  11. Marrying Too Young: End Child Marriage

    This report is a call to decision makers, parents, communities and to the world to end child marriage. It documents the current scope, prevalence and inequities associated with child marriage. This document argues that child marriage jeopardizes girls’ rights and stands in the way of girls living educated, healthy and productive lives. Furthemore, early marriage also excludes girls from fundamental decisions, such as the timing of marriage and choice of spouse. Not to mention that all of the effects of early marriage put girls more at risk of contracting HIV and other STIs. …

  12. Sports for adolescent girls

    Adolescence is a time when gender disparities between boys and girls become more pronounced. While many boys stay focused on school, girls often have more responsibilities at home. These responsibilities limit girls’ opportunities for maintaining social networks, and social isolation can contribute to increasing the risk of dropping out of school, marrying early, and being in situations that leave them vulnerable to pregnancy and HIV infection. At their most recent annual meeting, the Interagency Youth Working Group focused on protecting and empowering adolescent girls. …

  13. Breaking vows: early and forced marriage and girls' education

    One in every three girls in the developing world is married by the age of 18. One in seven marries before they reach the age of 15. In countries like Niger, Chad, Mali, Bangladesh, Guinea and the Central African Republic (CAR), the rate of early and forced marriage is 60 per cent and over. It is particularly high in South Asia (46 per cent) and in sub-Saharan Africa (38 per cent). …

  14. Developmentally Based Interventions and Strategies: Promoting Reproductive Health and Reducing Risk among Adolescents

    This tool has been prepared by FOCUS on Young Adults primarily for those who design and deliver programs and who formulate policies concerned with the well-being of young people in the developing world. It specifically explores (a) adolescence as a distinct stage in the developmental process,(b) the defining characteristics of adolescence, (c) the variety of factors that influence it, and (d) its societal and cultural relevance. …

  15. Gender and Sexuality/HIV Education

    Sex/HIV education curricula have disparate effects for females and males. Review of 59 rigorous sex ed evaluations from the U.S. and developing countries. After omitting single sex programs, programs with no effect, and programs that changed only knowledge, 38 remained (25 U.S. and 13 developing country). A third of these failed to disaggregate results by gender, leaving 25. This article looks at why this is the case and how gender affects SRH outcomes.

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