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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Rethinking HIV-prevention for school-going young people based on current behaviour patterns

    The aim of the research was to gain increased knowledge regarding the sexual risk behaviour of school-going young people in South Africa after two decades of HIV-education in schools, to contribute to the development of improved HIV prevention strategies. In collaboration with the Department of Education, a sample of 5305 learners (between 10 and 18 years in Grades 5–12) from high-risk communities were identified. …

  2. HIV prevention in Mexican schools: prospective randomised evaluation of intervention

    Objective: To assess effects on condom use and other sexual behaviour of an HIV prevention programme at school that promotes the use of condoms with and without emergency contraception. […] Intervention: Schools were randomised to one of three arms: an HIV prevention course that promoted condom use, the same course with emergency contraception as back-up, or the existing sex education course. Self administered anonymous questionnaires were completed at baseline, four months, and 16 months. …

  3. Education, HIV, and early fertility: experimental evidence from Kenya

    A seven-year randomized evaluation suggests education subsidies reduce adolescent girls’ dropout, pregnancy, and marriage but not sexually transmitted infection (STI). The government’s HIV curriculum, which stresses abstinence until marriage, does not reduce pregnancy or STI. Both programs combined reduce STI more, but cut dropout and pregnancy less, than education subsidies alone. …

  4. HIV and AIDS related knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of students and staff at South African technical and vocational education and training colleges in South Africa, 2014

    The present national survey of knowledge, attitudes and behaviours (KAB) of students and staff at technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges was the first to be conducted in this sector and served to obtain baseline measures on knowledge, attitudes and behaviour pertaining to HIV and related risk factors. This survey explored HIV/AIDS and related factors that affect the sector and which need to be addressed in order to mitigate the impact of the HIV and TB co-epidemic within it: 1. The overall knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards HIV/AIDS in the TVET sector; 2. …

  5. Factors associated with HIV infection among educated Malawians: analysis of the 2010 demographic and health survey

    Introduction: Among people who have ever attended school, higher educational attainment appears to be associated with higher prevalence of HIV. This study assesses the association between education and HIV status in Malawi, among individuals with some education, after adjusting for various background characteristics.

  6. Accessing the ‘right’ kinds of material and symbolic capital: the role of cash transfers in reducing adolescent school absence and risky behaviour in South Africa

    This article investigates how well South Africa’s Child Support Grant (CSG) responds to the material and psychosocial needs of adolescents, and the resultant effects on schooling and risky behaviour. One driver of schooling decisions is shame related to poverty and the ‘social cost’ of school, where a premium must often be paid for fashionable clothes or accessories. The other driver relates to symbolic and consumptive capital gained through engaging in sexual exchange relationships. The anticipated impacts from the CSG are partial because of these non-material drivers of adolescent choices. …

  7. The efficacy of HIV and sex education interventions among youths in developing countries: a review

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) among youths represent an important public health challenge in developing countries. The incidence of HIV peaked in the 1990’s and saw a decline from 2005. What was done to prompt the decline? To answer this question selecting studies between 1990 and 2005 was appropriate to assess whether the drop in HIV incidence in developing countries was as a result of education interventions. …

  8. Effects of peer education intervention on HIV/AIDS related sexual behaviors of secondary school students in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a quasi-experimental study

    Background: Worldwide, about 50 % of all new cases of HIV occur in youth between age 15 and 24 years. Studies in various sub-Saharan African countries show that both out of school and in school adolescents and youth are engaged in risky sexual behaviors. School-based health education has been a cornerstone of youth-focused HIV prevention efforts since the early 1990s. In addition, peer-based interventions have become a common method to effect important health-related behavior changes and address the HIV/AIDS pandemic. …

  9. The effectiveness of HIV/AIDS school-based sexual health education programmes in Nigeria: a systematic review

    HIV/AIDS is one of the most important public health challenges facing Nigeria today. Recent evidence has revealed that the adolescent population make up a large proportion of the 3.7% reported prevalence rate among Nigerians aged 15–49 years. School-based sexual health education has therefore become an important tool towards fighting this problem. This systematic review assesses the efficacy of these educational programmes and examines how future programmes and their evaluations can improve. …

  10. Multi-level risk and protective factors and HIV-related risk behaviours among young men who have sex with men (YMSM) in Myanmar

    This report presents findings from two cross-sectional surveys conducted in 2013–2014 among young (18 to 28 years) men who have sex with men (YMSM) in Yangon and Monywa, Myanmar. The primary objective of these surveys was to measure risk and protective factors and HIV related risk behaviours within this population.

  11. Situational analysis of young people at high risk of HIV exposure in Thailand: Synthesis report

    The main goals of this project are to review the situation of young key affected populations (YKAP) HIV risk behaviours in Thailand, review the present policy and programmatic response for YKAP, identify gaps and promising practices for YKAP, and determine strategic future policy and programming interventions for YKAP. …

  12. Prevention education in Eastern Europe and Central Asia: A review of policies and practices

    This review presents the results of an assessment of the policies and practices related to prevention education in ten countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA region). It consists of a regional overview (Chapters 1–6) and ten individual country assessments (Appendices 2–11). …

  13. Relative Risks and the Market for Sex: Teenagers, Sugar Daddies and HIV in Kenya

    An information campaign that provided Kenyan teenagers in randomly selected schools with the information that HIV prevalence was much higher among adult men and their partners than among teenage boys led to a 65% decrease in the incidence of pregnancies by adult partners among teenage girls in the treatment group relative to the comparison. This suggests a large reduction in the incidence of unprotected cross-generational sex. The information campaign did not increase pregnancies among teenage couples. …

  14. Preventing HIV transmission in adolescents: an analysis of the Portuguese data from the Health Behaviour School-aged Children study and focus groups

    This research examined demographic, personal, family and school variables related to adolescents’ sexual behaviour and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS infected people. This research was also designed to understand the cognitive and emotional bases of the sexual decisions made by adolescents. Preventive research must explore how young people understand, manage and explore their sexuality, risk and relationships.

  15. Is peer education the best approach for HIV prevention in schools? Findings from a randomized controlled trial

    The purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of peer education when compared to teacher-led curricula in AIDS prevention programs conducted in schools in Rome, Italy. The only apparent benefit of the peer-led intervention, compared to that led by teachers, was a greater improvement in knowledge of HIV. Neither of the interventions induced changes in sexual behavior. However, the role of possible biases and methodological problems must be considered when interpreting these results.

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