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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Guidelines for supporting sexual and gender diversity in schools. Sexuality discrimination and homophobic bullying

    It is a fundamental right of every child and young person to feel safe in their school environment. Western Australian schools pride themselves on being safe and effective learning environments that cater for the diverse needs of all students, including those who are (LGBTI) lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and other sexuality, sex and gender diverse people. Recognising LGBTI students and staff as an everyday part of the social mix of the school community is important in responding appropriately to their needs. …

  2. Don't ask don't tell. Hidden in the crowd : the need for documenting links between sexuality and suicidal behaviours amoung young people. Report on the same-sex attracted youth suicide data collection project

    This project was commissioned to establish whether agencies and services collected qualitative or quantitative data that might demonstrate links between suicidal behaviours and issues of sexuality for young people. …

  3. Sexuality and homophobia school audit for students. How is your school doing?

    This audit tool provides an opportunity for powerful learning through student enquiry within the school’s own community. Many schools are not very supportive places for students who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or simply unsure about their sexuality. Every student has a right to feel safe at school, and to get support when they need it. This questionnaire has been designed to find out from students how supportive their own school is for students who are attracted to people of the same sex. …

  4. Stand Out: against homophobia in schools

    Stand Out is the work of Australian students who are making a change in their schools, with their information on what you can do to challenge homophobia in yours.

  5. How to support sexual diversity in schools: a checklist

    Attitudes towards sexual diversity in Australia have undergone remarkable change in the last 10 years. Gay men and lesbians experience greater social acceptance and less discrimination than in the past. More public identities have been willing to be open about their sexuality. Despite these changes, a young person who is same sex attracted, or who thinks they might be, cannot be sure of their reception - at home or at school. Research tells us that 60% of same-sex attracted young people experience abuse, and that the greatest amount of the abuse (74%) occurs at schools. …

  6. Supporting sexual diversity in schools: a guide

    Homophobic bullying and assumptions of heterosexuality mean that many same sex attracted or gender questioning (SSAGQ) students feel frightened or less confident to attend school and/or feel unable to get support because it will mean they have to come out. This means that SSAGQ students experience interrupted access to the full range of school programs and activities, at times resulting in an inability to complete their studies or perform to their academic potential. …

  7. Safety in our schools: strategies for responding to homophobia

    Australian research about young people has found that schools can be very unsafe for students who are, or perceived to be, gay, lesbian, or bisexual. Research has also found that many teachers are reluctant to address issues to do with homosexuality, especially in relation to students. Like the rest of the community, school staff have a range of beliefs and concerns about homosexuality. Unlike the rest of the community, teachers work with many young people from diverse backgrounds representing different values, religious beliefs, and family expectations. …

  8. Writing themselves in again: 6 years on. The 2nd national report on the sexual health and well-being of same sex attracted young people in Australia

    Writing Themselves In Again - 6 years on: the 2nd national report on the sexuality, health and well-being of same sex attracted young Australians is the follow up report to a similar study conducted in 1998. The aim of the report is to find out whether the many changes in the community have improved the sexual health and well-being of same sex attracted young people (SSAY). In particular the project aimed to: 1. Document the levels of homophobia and discrimination facing SSAY today; 2. Document the impact of homophobia on young people themselves; 3. …

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