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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Let's talk early and unintended pregnancy!

    This booklet is aimed at helping adolescents better understand important issues in their life related to early and unintended pregnancy (EUP) – including puberty, contraception, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and relationships. The booklet starts by exploring the journey from childhood to adulthood. In this section, the changes that happen in males and females during puberty are described. Next, pregnancy in general is explained. Following this, EUP specifically is detailed, including causes, consequences, and prevention. …

  2. Measuring adolescent women’s sexual and reproductive health within a rights-based framework: Developing and applying an index

    To explore the feasibility of creating an easy-to-use summary data tool from survey data, we combined 16 indicators into an index measuring four dimensions of adolescent women’s sexual and reproductive health and rights. The index was tested using data from 30 countries that had relatively recent nationally representative surveys and were distributed across four regions. The resulting index, denoted by the summary acronym AISAR, examines adolescents’ access to information and services, agency in sexual activity and health, and perceptions of rights within marriage. …

  3. Risk for coerced sex among female youth in Ghana: Roles of family context, school enrollment and relationship experience

    CONTEXT: A better understanding is needed of the variables that may influence the risk of experiencing coerced sex among adolescent females in Sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: Data were collected from 700 female respondents who were interviewed in 2010 and 2012 waves of a longitudinal study of behavioral risk for HIV infection among youth aged 13–14 or 18–19 and living in two towns in southeastern Ghana. …

  4. Gender inequality and HIV transmission: a global analysis

    Introduction: The HIV pandemic disproportionately impacts young women. Worldwide, young women aged 15–24 are infected with HIV at rates twice that of young men, and young women alone account for nearly a quarter of all new HIV infections. The incommensurate HIV incidence in young – often poor – women underscores how social and economic inequalities shape the HIV epidemic. Confluent social forces, including political and gender violence, poverty, racism, and sexism impede equal access to therapies and effective care, but most of all constrain the agency of women. …

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