• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 13 results in 0.017 seconds.

Search results

  1. Education, HIV, and early fertility: experimental evidence from Kenya

    A seven-year randomized evaluation suggests education subsidies reduce adolescent girls’ dropout, pregnancy, and marriage but not sexually transmitted infection (STI). The government’s HIV curriculum, which stresses abstinence until marriage, does not reduce pregnancy or STI. Both programs combined reduce STI more, but cut dropout and pregnancy less, than education subsidies alone. …

  2. The adolescent experience in-depth: using data to identify and reach the most vulnerable young people: Tanzania 2009-2012

    This report presents a secondary data analysis and triangulation of the Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) 2010, the Tanzania HIV and Malaria Indicator Survey (THMIS) 2011-12, and the Violence Against Children in Tanzania Survey (VACS) 2009. Its objectives are to analyse approximately 40 key indicators related to knowledge, attitudes, behaviours and outcomes (e.g. …

  3. School-based interventions for preventing HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and pregnancy in adolescents (Review)

    Background: School-based sexual and reproductive health programmes are widely accepted as an approach to reducing high-risk sexual behaviour among adolescents. Many studies and systematic reviews have concentrated on measuring effects on knowledge or self-reported behaviour rather than biological outcomes, such as pregnancy or prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Objectives: To evaluate the effects of school-based sexual and reproductive health programmes on sexually transmitted infections (such as HIV, herpes simplex virus, and syphilis), and pregnancy among adolescents.

  4. Teenage pregnancy strategy: beyond 2010

    This document sets out how we want to build on the key planks of the existing Strategy so that all young people: receive the information, advice and support they need – from parents, teachers and other professionals – to deal with pressure to have sex; enjoy positive and caring relationships; and experience good sexual health; and can access and know how to use contraception effectively when they do reach the stage that they become sexually active, so they can avoid unplanned pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). …

  5. Early adolescent pregnancy increases risk of incident HIV infection in the Eastern Cape, South Africa: a longitudinal study

    INTRODUCTION: Adolescents having unprotected heterosexual intercourse are at risk of HIV infection and unwanted pregnancy. However, there is little evidence to indicate whether pregnancy in early adolescence increases the risk of subsequent HIV infection. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that adolescent pregnancy (aged 15 or younger) increases the risk of incident HIV infection in young South African women. …

  6. Executive Summary: Sexual risk and protective factors. Factors affecting teen sexual behavior, pregnancy, childbearing and sexually transmitted disease: What are important? Which can you change?

    Executive Summary: Sexual Risk and Protective Factors. Factors Affecting Teen Sexual Behavior, Pregnancy, Childbearing And Sexually Transmitted Disease: What Are Important? Which Can You Change? is a document part of the project of the United States National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. It addresses two main primary questions: 1) what factors influence adolescents' decisions about sex? And 2) Which of these factors can be altered? By identifying and targeting those factors it tries to provide information to reduce sexual risk-taking.

  7. Safer choices: preventing HIV, other STD and pregnancy

    This is an in-school HIV, STI and pregnancy prevention programme targeting high-school students. It aims to help young people delay sex initiation and, if they have sex, to use condoms and minimise the number of sexual partners. An important feature of Safer Choices is its school-wide approach. The programme is not limited to an in-class curriculum but also involves teachers, parents, community members and students through a peer leader component. …

  8. Draw the line/respect the line: setting limits to prevent HIV, STD and pregnancy. Grade 8

    This publication is focused on providing students with the skills to define their own sexual limits and to have these limits respected in case of pressure. These "healthy sexual limits" are intended to help keep young people safe from HIV, STIs and pregnancy. The programme is divided into 19 one-hour sessions distributed over three grade levels (Grades 6, 7 and 8) and is designed for in-school use either by a school-teacher or an outside educator. It is especially targeted at Latino students, but has nee used with students of all races/ethnicities. …

  9. Draw the line/respect the line: setting limits to prevent HIV, STD and pregnancy. Grade 7

    This publication is focused on providing students with the skills to define their own sexual limits and to have these limits respected in case of pressure. These "healthy sexual limits" are intended to help keep young people safe from HIV, STIs and pregnancy. The programme is divided into 19 one-hour sessions distributed over three grade levels (Grades 6, 7 and 8) and is designed for in-school use either by a school-teacher or an outside educator. It is especially targeted at Latino students, but has nee used with students of all races/ethnicities. …

  10. Draw the line/respect the line: setting limits to prevent HIV, STD and pregnancy. Grade 6

    This publication is focused on providing students with the skills to define their own sexual limits and to have these limits respected in case of pressure. These "healthy sexual limits" are intended to help keep young people safe from HIV, STIs and pregnancy. The programme is divided into 19 one-hour sessions distributed over three grade levels (Grades 6, 7 and 8) and is designed for in-school use either by a school-teacher or an outside educator. It is especially targeted at Latino students, but has nee used with students of all races/ethnicities. …

  11. Focus on youth: an HIV prevention program for African-American youth

    This is an HIV and sexually transmitted disease (STD) and teen pregnancy prevention programme targeting African-American youth between the ages of 12 and 15. First developed for recreation centres, it has been adapted to school settings. It is the updated version of the Focus on kids curriculum first developed in the 1990s. This curriculum has been thoroughly reviewed and evaluated and has been successfully exported to different cultural settings such as the Bahamas, China, Namibia and Viet Nam. …

  12. Making proud choices! A safer-sex approach to HIV/STDs and teen pregnancy prevention

    This is an eight hour curriculum mainly targeted at minority young people between the ages of 11 and 13. It is divided into eight modules featuring interactive activities such as games, role-play, brainstorming and videos. Developed by a team of experts from the University of Pennsylvania, it is recommended by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This curriculum promotes sexual abstinence as the most effective way to prevent STIs, HIV and teenage pregnancy, but it also places emphasis on safer sex practices and condom use. …

  13. Reducing the risk: building skills to prevent pregnancy, STD and HIV

    This is an HIV, STI and teenage pregnancy prevention curriculum targeting high-school students (Grades 9 to 12, ages 14 to 18). It is designed to be incorporated into a broader family life or health education programme. This evidence-based curriculum has been thoroughly evaluated. Reducing the Risk promotes abstinence as the most effective means of preventing HIV, STIs and teen pregnancy, but also advocates the use of contraception and condoms for individuals who choose to be sexually active. …

Our mission

Supporting education ministries, researchers and practitioners through a comprehensive database, website and information service.