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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. My big story book – learners and teachers tell their stories on living positively with HIV: a practical guide for teachers

    This Guide has been developed for all teachers, and supporters of learners and children in-school, who may either be infected with, or affected by, HIV. It can also be used by older children who are working with younger children in school settings, supporting them to cope with the effects of HIV, either in school, in their homes or in their communities. Learners ranging from age 7 – 17 years of age will benefit from My Big Story Book and therefore this Guide is relevant for anyone teaching or working with learners in this age group in schools. …

  2. Initial teacher training: developing an inclusive programme of study

    Good initial teacher training (ITT) equips teachers with the information, resources and tools they need to help children and young people enjoy learning and fulfil their potential. But finding the time to teach trainees about the range of issues they might experience during their teaching career can be difficult. Schools have a legal duty to prevent and tackle all forms of bullying, including homophobic bullying. …

  3. Ready, set, respect! GLSEN's elementary school toolkkit

    Ready, Set, Respect! provides a set of tools to help elementary school educators ensure that all students feel safe and respected and develop respectful attitudes and behaviors. It is not a program to be followed but instead is designed to help educators prepare themselves for teaching about and modeling respect. The toolkit responds to elementary educators’ suggestion that they rarely teach about the kinds of topics (name-calling and bias, gender roles, and family diversity) addressed in the Ready, Set, Respect! toolkit. …

  4. Leave It Out: developing anti-homophobic bullying practice in schools

    Homophobia is not unique to Northern Ireland, but it does exist and manifests itself in a multitude of ways within our society. In recent years, the Human Rights Commission, the Department of Education for Northern Ireland, the Northern Ireland Commissioner for Children & Young People, Youthnet and The Rainbow Project have all produced reports confirming that homophobic bullying is a problem within our schools.These reports reveal that enduring repeated verbal and physical abuse motivated by homophobia is leading some children and young people to attain less and to leave school earlier. …

  5. Safe for all: a best practice guide to prevent homophobic bullying in secondary schools

    Bullying related to sexual orientation is now recognised as a serious issue with which schools should engage. This guide is intended for governors, school staff or other professionals who want to prevent or challenge homophobic bullying in secondary schools. Evidence increasingly suggests that attention to the physical and emotional well-being of pupils (including helping those who are bullied or who bully) can and does lead to more effective schools and raised academic attainment. …

  6. An educator's guide to intervening in anti-gay (LGBTQ) harassment

    This document provides advice and tips for educators for intervening in anti-gay harassment within schools.

  7. Family's guide to handling anti-gay (LGBTQ) harassment: US version

    This guide provides advice and tips for families to deal with anti-gay harassment.

  8. Head teacher's guide to handling anti-gay harassment: UK specific version

    This guide provides advice and tips for head teachers in handling anti-gay harassment in schools.

  9. A teacher's guide to surviving anti-gay harassment

    The academic consequences of bullying are severe, not to mention the mental and physical well-being of targeted students and bystanders alike. Bullying is not a new phenomenon, of course, but neither is it an unalterable fact of childhood. School-wide anti-bullying projects, involving parents and non-teaching staff along with teachers and student leaders have been shown to reduce harassment by as much as fifty percent.

  10. A family's guide to handling anti-gay (LGBTQ) harassment [Washington State version]

    The academic consequences of bullying are severe, not to mention the mental and physical well-being of targeted students and bystanders alike. Bullying is not a new phenomenon, of course, but neither is it an unalterable fact of childhood. School-wide anti-bullying projects, involving parents and non-teaching staff along with teachers and student leaders have been shown to reduce harassment by as much as fifty percent.

  11. Safer school formals: a guide

    The end of the school year is a stressful and exciting time for senior students. It is a time full of pressing decisions, preparations for the future, exams and of course planning for one of the biggest nights in the school calendar, the school formal/prom/deb. For same sex attracted (SSA) and gender questioning (GQ) students participating in end-of-year festivities may not always carry the same excitement. While many schools pride themselves on their inclusive and anti-discrimination policies, the rights of SSAGQ students can often be overlooked. …

  12. Promoting equal opportunities in education, project two: guidance on dealing with homophobic incidents

    The objectives of the research are: - To identify current policy in relation to homophobic incidents in Scottish schools, both from the perspectives of EAs and school staff; - To identify current practice in dealing with homophobic incidents in Scottish schools, both from the perspectives of EAs and school staff; - To determine awareness levels of homophobic incidents amongst EAs and school staff; - To determine confidence levels amongst school staff in dealing with homophobic incidents; - To determine confidence levels amongst school staff in discussing antihomophobia and LGBT issues with pup …

  13. Supporting sexual diversity in schools: a guide

    Homophobic bullying and assumptions of heterosexuality mean that many same sex attracted or gender questioning (SSAGQ) students feel frightened or less confident to attend school and/or feel unable to get support because it will mean they have to come out. This means that SSAGQ students experience interrupted access to the full range of school programs and activities, at times resulting in an inability to complete their studies or perform to their academic potential. …

  14. Guidance for schools on preventing and responding to sexist, sexual and transphobic bullying. Safe to learn: embedding anti-bullying work in schools, quick guide

    Every child in every school has the right to learn free from the fear of bullying, whatever form that bullying may take. Everyone involved in a child's education needs to work together to ensure this is the case. Sexist, sexual and transphobic bullying occurs when a pupil (or group), usually repeatedly, harms another pupil or intentionally makes them unhappy because of their sex or because they may not be perceived to conform to normal gender roles. The root cause of sexist and sexual bullying is gender inequality.

  15. The education equality curriculum guide: supporting teachers in tackling homophobia in school

    This guide focuses predominantly on issues of sexual orientation and homophobia. These lessons are designed for use at Key Stage 3. They can be adapted and used to suit different year groups and abilities. Some lessons already provide ideas and resources for differentiation within the class. The majority of the lessons focus on sexual orientation or an investigation of homophobia; the same activities can be adapted and applied to other causes such as sectarianism/racism. There are also lessons however, which bring in LGBT issues and people as one of many other issues. …

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