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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Live life positively: know your HIV status

    On World AIDS Day 2018, HIV testing is being brought into the spotlight. And for good reason. Around the world, 37 million people are living with HIV, the highest number ever, yet a quarter do not know that they have the virus.

  2. HIV/AIDS and teacher absenteeism: implications for attainment of quality education in Uganda

    This powerpoint presents a qualitative study carried out in the districts of Bushenyi (rural without civil conflict), Katakwi (rural and affected by armed conflict) and Kampala (urban). It looks at the nature and magnitude of teachers’ absenteeism and the extent to which HIV/AIDS has escalated it and assesses the impact of HIV/AIDS-based teachers’ absenteeism on the attainment of the quality of education. The study also proposes functional solutions to address the causes and effects of teachers absenteeism with specific emphasis on HIV/AIDS-based absenteeism.

  3. School experiences of HIV-positive secondary school learners on ARV treatment in Namibia

    Although the provision of life-saving antiretroviral (ARV) treatment is central to the medical and policy response to the HIV pandemic, relatively little research in the SADC region and in Namibia particularly, attends to HIV-positive people's experiences and the social effects of taking ARV treatment, with children being least focused on. The study from which the paper is drawn contributes to this dearth by examining the experiences of HIV-positive high school learners on ARV treatment in Khomas Region, Namibia. …

  4. HIV in schools: a good practice guide to supporting children living with and affected by HIV

    Schools are an important part of a child's life and provide a supportive, caring environment. Yet still in 2015, the reactions of staff, parent/carers or pupils, to a child who is living with or affected by HIV, have in some cases led to the child feeling unable to remain at that school. This guidance by Magda Conway is an update of the comprehensive resource published by NCB in 2005, and a collaboration between the Children's HIV Association (CHIVA) and NCB. …

  5. My big story book – learners and teachers tell their stories on living positively with HIV: a practical guide for teachers

    This Guide has been developed for all teachers, and supporters of learners and children in-school, who may either be infected with, or affected by, HIV. It can also be used by older children who are working with younger children in school settings, supporting them to cope with the effects of HIV, either in school, in their homes or in their communities. Learners ranging from age 7 – 17 years of age will benefit from My Big Story Book and therefore this Guide is relevant for anyone teaching or working with learners in this age group in schools. …

  6. Network of teachers and educational workers in HIV and AIDS, Ghana (NETEWAG) strategic plan 2015-2020

    NETEWAG (Network of Teachers and Educational workers in HIV and AIDS, Ghana) envisions a stigma and discrimination free and equal opportunity environment for Teachers and Educational workers living with HIV in Ghana. Teachers play a key custodian role within the education system and are also central to efforts to achieve the Education for All (EFA) and Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). However like their counterparts in other sub Saharan African countries, teachers in Ghana have not been spared the threat of HIV and AIDS. …

  7. SRH and HIV linkages compendium: Indicators and related assessment tools

    Ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights and HIV prevention, treatment, care and support are essential for development, including in the post 2015 agenda. However, while there are many separate sexual and reproductive health (SRH) related and HIV-related indicators, a key challenge has been the lack of internationally agreed indicators to measure progress in linking SRH and HIV. …

  8. Voices of HIV and AIDS-affected educators: How they are psychosocially affected and how REds enabled their resilience

    The aim of this article is to hear the voices of HIV- and AIDS-affected educators regarding their experiences of the psychosocial effect that the HIV and AIDS pandemic has on them as well as to voice their experiences of how Resilient Educators (REds), a support programme to enable educators affected by HIV and AIDS towards resilience, enabled them. A qualitative study was undertaken with 100 affected educators from different provinces in South Africa. Open-ended questionnaires were used to collect data prior to and after exposure to REds. …

  9. Positive connections: leading information and support groups for adolescents living with HIV

    Positive Connections: Leading Information and Support Groups for Adolescents Living with HIV is a unique guide that provides facilitators with background information about the needs of ALHIV, tips for starting an adult-led information and support group, and 14 sessions to follow in a group setting. …

  10. Sub-regional workshop on support for the movement of teachers infected and/or affected by HIV and AIDS in West and Central Africa: Report on workshop proceedings

    In West and Central Africa (WCA), teachers are among the most vulnerable since they are seen as role models in the community. HIV & AIDS increase the morbidity and the mortality of already inadequate number of teachers within the education sector. HIV & AIDS-related stigma and discrimination are persistent among teachers in the region. …

  11. Positive learning: meeting the needs of young people living with HIV (YPLHIV) in the education sector

    This publication is the result of a partnership between UNESCO and the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+). It builds upon the respective work of these organisations in relation to supporting the ideals of Education for All and the role of the education sector in the global response to HIV (UNESCO) and the Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention framework (GNP+). The overall purpose is to better define the role and responsibilities of the education sector in supporting young people who are living with HIV (YPLHIV) to realise their personal, social and educational potential. …

  12. Courage and Hope. African teachers living positively with HIV

    122,000 teachers in sub-Saharan Africa are estimated to be living with HIV, most of who do not know their status. Stigma remains their greatest challenge. In 2007, a network of African journalists compiled a book entitled “Courage and Hope” telling the first-hand stories of African teachers who are HIV positive and living healthy, active lives as teachers. This film shows some of the stories those journalists discovered. The teachers went through stigma and discrimination and each used their experience to teach a new generation of teachers, what it means to live positively.

  13. Zindagi Mile Dobara HIV Treatment Education

    Today, it is possible to live healthy with HIV. Indeed, Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) has been a significant breakthrough in the struggle against HIV and AIDS. In a major advancement for public health, the Government of India rolled out provision of free ART in 2004, making it available for every person living with HIV. The possibility of treatment brings back a sense of hope, and helps reduce the stigma and fear often associated with HIV and AIDS. …

  14. I Am One of 7 Million: YPLHIV Advocacy Messages

    This advocacy poster containing key messages and briefing paper were developed by GNP+ and the World AIDS Campaign by and for youth. They emerged from a literature review, key informant interviews and an online survey of 168 youth livign with HIV from 55 countries. The messages are also available in French, Spanish, and Russian.

  15. HIV sero-status disclosure in the school context: experiences of adolescents perinatally infected with HIV in Uganda

    In this paper, we use data from Uganda to examine disclosure of HIV sero-status in the school context by adolescents perinatally infected with HIV. We begin by presenting evidence of the existence of stigma and discrimination in schools from the perspectives of school officials, in-school young people perinatally infected with HIV, and other students. We then examine the level of disclosure of sero-status to school officials and friends by adolescents perinatally infected with HIV. …

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