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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. A tool for change: working with the media on issues relating to sexual orientation, gender identity, expression and sex characteristics in Thailand

    A Tool for Change: Working with the Media on Issues Relating to Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, Expression and Sex Characteristics in Thailand analyzes news media coverage of Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, Expression and Sex Characteristics (SOGIESC), and LGBTIQ identities across media platforms in Thailand. The research found that LGBTIQ people are often represented in the news media inaccurately, stereotypically, or without a clear understanding of SOGIE. The study recommends that a professional code of conduct on reporting SOGIESC issues be developed. …

  2. If you care about LGBTQ rights... Then you should care about sex education

    The first fact sheet of the If/Then series highlights that advancing sex education also means advancing the equality and well-being of the LGBTQ community at large.

  3. From shadows to light: advocacy for children of HIV-affected key populations

    For many years now, the children of HIV-affected key populations—sex workers, transgender people, people who use drugs and gay men and other men who have sex with men—have remained in the shadows. …

  4. No one left behind: understanding key populations, achieving triple zeros by 2030

    This book focuses on 6 key populations, i.e. sex workers, people who inject drugs, men who have sex with men, transgender individuals, beach boys and prisoners. It describes reasons why these key populations are at higher risk of acquiring HIV infections, the current situation of Sri Lankan laws and how discrimination and social stigma prevent these particular key population groups approaching health care services. …

  5. Being LGBT in Asia: Thailand country report. A participatory review and analysis of the legal and social environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) persons and civil society

    This report provides an overview of LGBT rights in Thailand as related broadly to laws and policies, social and cultural attitudes, and religion; and more specifically to employment and housing, education and young people, health and well-being, family and society, media and information communication technology (ICT), and the organizational capacity of LGBT organizations.

  6. Being LGBT in Asia: the Philippines country report. A participatory review and analysis of the legal and social environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) persons and civil society

    Being LGBT in Asia: the Philippines Country Report provides an overview of LGBT rights in the Philippines including the effects of laws, policies, culture and social attitudes, and religion, based on research, consultation and the National LGBT Community Dialogue. This overview is followed by an examination of the Philippines experience of protecting the rights of LGBT people under eight different areas: education, health, employment, family affairs, religion, community, media and politics, using the same methodology as described above. …

  7. Being LGBT in Asia: Mongolia country report. A participatory review and analysis of the legal and social environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) persons and civil society

    This report presents an overview of LGBT rights in Mongolia as well as background about the legal, institutional, cultural and social environment in which Mongolia’s LGBT community lives. The report also analyses the role of international human rights mechanisms in promoting the rights of LGBT persons in the country. With respect to day-to-day living, the report examines employment, education, health, family affairs and media. Finally, the report looks at the development of Mongolia’s LGBT community and the capacity of organizations working on LGBT issues.

  8. The hidden dimension: experience of self-stigma among young men who have sex with men and young transgender women and the linkages to HIV in Asia and the Pacific

    MSM and transgender people requires addressing self-issues and the linkages with HIV vulnerability and risk behavior. Yet to date, many HIV-related programs in Asia have failed to address self-stigma. To better understand how self-stigma relates to HIV, YVC undertook an in-person consultation in October 2012 in Bangkok, Thailand, and commissioned in-country research in 10 countries: Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Laos, Mongolia, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam. …

  9. Human rights and the HIV response: a rapid assessment of human rights violations in the context of HIV, in the Eastern and Southern Africa region, and a review of current approaches to protecting and promoting human rights for an effective HIV response

    Key populations, specifically people who sell sex (PWSS), people who inject drugs (PWID) and lesbian, and gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people experience significant human rights violations which underpin the continued high HIV incidence in these populations. This rapid assessment of human rights violations in Eastern and southern Africa focuses on three priority key populations – PWSS, LGBTI (including MSM), and PWID. The report outlines the normative international treaties that establish a basis for a human rights framework for the HIV response.

  10. Leave no one behind: gender, sexuality and the sustainable development goals: evidence report

    In an unprecedented move to eradicate disease, poverty and hunger, world leaders joined together in 2000 to sign into life the hotly contested but broadly agreed upon Millennium Development Goal (MDG) framework. In 2015, as the MDGs come to an end, a new generation of world leaders – government officials, donors and civil society organisations – have joined forces to articulate their vision for a future where all people can contribute to, and benefit from, an inclusive development framework. …

  11. Eliminating discrimination against children and parents based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity

    This position paper is based on UNICEF’s mandate to promote and protect the rights of all children. UNICEF will continue working to protect all children from discrimination, including those who identify as LGBT.

  12. The 2013 National School Climate Survey. The experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth in our nation’s schools

    The 2013 National School Climate Survey is GLSEN's 8th biennial report on the school experiences of LGBT youth in schools, including the in-school resources that support LGBT students’ well-being, the extent of the challenges that they face at school, and insights into many other aspects of LGBT students’ experiences.

  13. Policy analysis and advocacy decision model for services for key populations in Kenya

    From 2010–2012, the global Health Policy Project (funded by the United States Agency for International Development), in partnership with African Men for Sexual Health and Rights (AMSHeR), developed Policy Analysis and Advocacy Decision Model for HIV-Related Services: Males Who Have Sex with Males, Transgender People, and Sex Workers (Beardsley K., 2013), hereafter referred to as the Decision Model. …

  14. Gender nonconforming youth: Discipline disparities, school push-out, and the school-to-prison pipeline

    The school-to-prison pipeline, or STPP, refers to a set of school policies and practices that push students away from education and onto a pathway toward the juvenile detention and the prison industrial complex. School policies and practices that promote the STPP include “zero tolerance” policies, increased police presence, suspension and expulsion, and harsh and disparate disciplinary practices. Research has demonstrated that students pushed out by such policies, practices, and disciplinary disparities are disproportionally students of color and low-income students. …

  15. Era como ir todos los días al matadero...: El bullying homofóbico en instituciones públicas de Chile, Guatemala y Perú. Documento de trabajo

    En los últimos años, el reconocimiento mundial del bullying homofóbico como un problema social se ha hecho cada vez más claro, así como el de su asociación a una serie de consecuencias en la salud y el bienestar de las y los afectados, incluyendo la depresión y el suicidio (UNESCO, 2011); sin embargo, la comprensión del probléma es aún insuficiente (Espelage et al., 2003). A pesar del conocimiento de la prominencia del sexismo y la homofobia en América Latina, una revisión regional reciente mostró que la información disponible es limitada (UNESCO, 2011). …

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