• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 638 results in 0.014 seconds.

Search results

  1. An HIV/AIDS workplace policy for the education sector in the Caribbean

    The purpose of this policy is to provide a framework for addressing HIV and AIDS as a workplace issue in education sector institutions and services through social dialogue processes, in complement of other national workplace or overall education sector policies where they exist. …

  2. An HIV and AIDS workplace policy for the education sector in southern Africa

    This policy is based on the ILO code of practice on HIV/AIDS and the world of work (hereafter, "the ILO code of practice"), adopted by an international tripartite meeting convened by the ILO in 2001, and includes key concepts and principles of the ILO code of practice. Development of the Policy has resulted from collaboration between ILO and UNESCO.The Policy was carefully reviewed and modified during a tripartite workshop held in Maputo, Mozambique, 30 November - 2 December 2005, composed of representatives from seven southern African countries. …

  3. Addressing the educational needs of orphans and vulnerable children

    This paper was developed by the working group on education and HIV/AIDS and summarises issues raised from a meeting in London on 10 December 2003. The paper describes the educational disadvantage faced by OVC's. It goes on to look at educational responses with a specific focus on three: open and distance learning; school feeding schemes; and the index for inclusion.

  4. Comparative analysis: research studies from India and Uganda: HIV and AIDS-related discrimination, stigmatisation and denial

    Discrimination, stigmatisation and denial have been recognized as important issues to be addressed in the context of HIV/AIDS. Discrimination against those living with HIV/AIDS, or presumed to be infected, is a violation of human rights. All individuals deserve equal respect and dignity, whatever their situation and whatever their status. This key Material succinctly describes and compares findings from studies, conducted in India and Uganda, of the nature, determinants and effects of HIV/AIDS-related discrimination, stigmatisation and denial. …

  5. India: HIV and AIDS-related discrimination, stigmatisation and denial

    Discrimination, stigmatisation and denial have been recognized as important issues to be addressed in the context of HIV/AIDS. Discrimination against those living with HIV/AIDS, or presumed to be infected, is a violation of human rights. All individuals deserve equal respect and dignity, whatever their situation and whatever their status. This key Material describes the findings from a study of the nature, determinants and the effects of HIV/AIDS-related discrimination, stigmatization and denial in India. …

  6. HIV/AIDS related stigma and discrimination: A conceptual framework and agenda for action

    Internationally, there has been a recent resurgence of interest in HIV and AIDS-related stigma and discrimination, triggered at least in part by growing recognition that negative social responses to the epidemic remain pervasive even in seriously affected communities. Yet, rarely are existing notions of stigma and discrimination interrogated for their conceptual adequacy and their usefulness in leading to the design of effective programmes and interventions. …

  7. The role of stigma and discrimination in increasing the vulnerability of children and youth with and affected by HIV/AIDS

    This report clearly illustrates the powerful and negative effects of stigma on those affected by HIV/AIDS. The stories from children are particularly powerful and impacting. This report aims to put across the message that combating HIV/AIDS requires a strong and coordinated reponse from all sectors of society.

  8. Health seeking behaviour and the control of sexually transmitted disease

    What people do when they have symptoms or suspicion of a sexually transmitted disease (STD) has major implications for transmission and, consequently, for disease control. Delays in seeking and obtaining diagnosis and treatment can allow for continued transmission and the greater probability of adverse sequelae. An understanding of health seeking behaviour is therefore important if STD control programmes are to be effective. However, taboos and stigma related to sex and STD in most cultures mean that gaining a true picture is difficult and requires considerable cultural sensitivity. …

Pages

Our mission

Supporting education ministries, researchers and practitioners through a comprehensive database, website and information service.