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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. HIV/AIDS and teacher absenteeism: implications for attainment of quality education in Uganda

    This powerpoint presents a qualitative study carried out in the districts of Bushenyi (rural without civil conflict), Katakwi (rural and affected by armed conflict) and Kampala (urban). It looks at the nature and magnitude of teachers’ absenteeism and the extent to which HIV/AIDS has escalated it and assesses the impact of HIV/AIDS-based teachers’ absenteeism on the attainment of the quality of education. The study also proposes functional solutions to address the causes and effects of teachers absenteeism with specific emphasis on HIV/AIDS-based absenteeism.

  2. Supporting HIV-positive learners in inclusive classes in South Africa: Is it the responsibility of teachers

    The adoption of White Paper 6 of 2001 in South Africa on the implementation of inclusive education has become an important milestone to ensure the accommodation of the full range of learner needs in ordinary schools. This paper deals with the rights and needs of HIV-positive learners and their first line of support, namely ordinary teachers, who form the backbone of support within the inclusive classroom. At the moment, learners living with HIV miss out frequently on help and support because specialist out-of-school HIV and AIDS services are not geared towards their needs. …

  3. Special needs of in-school HIV positive young people in Uganda

    The objective of this study was to explore the special needs HIV positive young people in primary and secondary schools in Uganda with a view to identifying possible responses by the education sector to these needs. It was implemented by the Population Council in collaboration with the Child Health and Development Centre- Makerere University, The AIDS Support Organization (TASO)- Uganda, and the Ministry of Education- Uganda, through funding from the Ford Foundation. …

  4. Rising to the Challenge. Health Policy Initiative Helps HIV-positive Teachers Tackle Stigma and Discrimination in Kenya

    While HIV-related stigma is a challenge throughout Kenyan society, it has rendered certain groups particularly vulnerable. Teachers have been acutely stigmatized because of their positions of trust in the society. Teachers living with HIV have been wrongfully dismissed, interdicted (officially barred from performing their teaching duties), or forced to resign their posts because of their status. Recently, this situation has begun to change, in part, due to the efforts of networks of teachers living with and affected by HIV. …

  5. The impact of the AIDS epidemic on teachers in sub-Saharan Africa: a further update

    It is still widely anticipated that the AIDS epidemic will have a devastating impact on the education sector in Africa. Faced with this impending crisis, leading experts have called for a transformation in the functioning of schools and the mainstreaming of HIV and AIDS in the education sector supported by donors. Numerous reports and articles state that the number of teachers dying from AIDS-related illnesses continues to increase very rapidly and that this is causing serious shortages of teachers. This article updates the figures that are known in that field.

  6. Courage and hope: stories from teachers living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa

    It is estimated that there are currently around 122,000 teachers in sub- Saharan Africa who are living with HIV, the vast majority of whom have not sought testing and do not know their HIV status. Stigma remains the greatest challenge and the major barrier to accessing and providing assistance to these teachers. The personal experiences from the 12 teachers presented in this book offer first-hand accounts of the difficult, and sometimes debilitating, challenges faced by teachers living with HIV. …

  7. HIV/AIDS and Trauma among learners: Sexual Violence and Deprivation in South Africa

    This article discusses the impact of HIV/AIDS on education in South Africa. South Africa has the fastest growing HIV/AIDS epidemic in the world. In 2001 over 4 million people were already HIV positive, 56% of them women. It is not yet possible to determine rates of HIV infection in schools and other learning institutions - among educators and among learners. The HIV/AIDS projection model commonly used in South Africa suggests that among 15-19 year olds almost 16% of African females are likely to be HIV positive, compared with about 3% of African males. …

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