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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Live life positively: know your HIV status

    On World AIDS Day 2018, HIV testing is being brought into the spotlight. And for good reason. Around the world, 37 million people are living with HIV, the highest number ever, yet a quarter do not know that they have the virus.

  2. Network of teachers and educational workers in HIV and AIDS, Ghana (NETEWAG) strategic plan 2015-2020

    NETEWAG (Network of Teachers and Educational workers in HIV and AIDS, Ghana) envisions a stigma and discrimination free and equal opportunity environment for Teachers and Educational workers living with HIV in Ghana. Teachers play a key custodian role within the education system and are also central to efforts to achieve the Education for All (EFA) and Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). However like their counterparts in other sub Saharan African countries, teachers in Ghana have not been spared the threat of HIV and AIDS. …

  3. Antiretroviral drug access and behavior change

    Access to antiretroviral (ARV) drugs in Sub-Saharan Africa has rapidly expanded - from fewer than 10,000 people treated in 2000 to more than 8 million in 2011. To measure the impact of this expansion, it is necessary to identify the behavioral response of individuals to drug access. This paper combines geocoded information about the timing of introduction of ARVs in all Kenyan health facilities with two waves of geocoded population surveys to estimate the impact of proximity to an ARV provider on risky sexual behavior. …

  4. Positive learning: meeting the needs of young people living with HIV (YPLHIV) in the education sector

    This publication is the result of a partnership between UNESCO and the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+). It builds upon the respective work of these organisations in relation to supporting the ideals of Education for All and the role of the education sector in the global response to HIV (UNESCO) and the Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention framework (GNP+). The overall purpose is to better define the role and responsibilities of the education sector in supporting young people who are living with HIV (YPLHIV) to realise their personal, social and educational potential. …

  5. Zindagi Mile Dobara HIV Treatment Education

    Today, it is possible to live healthy with HIV. Indeed, Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) has been a significant breakthrough in the struggle against HIV and AIDS. In a major advancement for public health, the Government of India rolled out provision of free ART in 2004, making it available for every person living with HIV. The possibility of treatment brings back a sense of hope, and helps reduce the stigma and fear often associated with HIV and AIDS. …

  6. HIV stops with me. "Positive prevention": Prevention for people living with HIV

    This booklet is a positive prevention end-user guide for people living with HIV. Positive prevention methods aim to increase the self-esteem and confidence of people living with HIV to protect their own health and avoid passing HIV to others. They promote the rights of people to safer sexual relationships, the fulfillment on their reproductive choices and living a full and healthy life. Positive prevention represents a synergy between prevention, treatment, care and support.

  7. Supporting the educational needs of HIV-positive learners: a desk-based study

    The purpose of this desk-based research was to review policy with respect to the education of HIV-positive children and to examine how their education can be encouraged and supported in primary and secondary school settings. This was done through an appraisal of the scientific literature that had a bearing on the special needs of the children, and the public statements of national and international organizations dealing with the epidemic. …

  8. The impact of the AIDS epidemic on teachers in sub-Saharan Africa: a further update

    It is still widely anticipated that the AIDS epidemic will have a devastating impact on the education sector in Africa. Faced with this impending crisis, leading experts have called for a transformation in the functioning of schools and the mainstreaming of HIV and AIDS in the education sector supported by donors. Numerous reports and articles state that the number of teachers dying from AIDS-related illnesses continues to increase very rapidly and that this is causing serious shortages of teachers. This article updates the figures that are known in that field.

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