• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 4 results in 0.016 seconds.

Search results

  1. Population Brief

    Articles from this issue : Making sexuality and HIV education programs more effective | Reducing adolescent girls’ vulnerability to sexual violence in sub-Saharan Africa | Developing a highly acceptable contraceptive vaginal ring | Creating a database of HIV prevention clinical trial terminology and translations.

  2. Youth in a void: sexuality, HIV/AIDS and communication in Kenyan public schools

    The disappearance of traditional sex education during rites of passage in African societies has left many youth uncertain of where to look for information. Against this backcloth, the objectives of this study were to identify knowledge gaps amongst adolescents in Kenya regarding sexuality, HIV/AIDS and reproductive health. A thematic analysis was conducted of questions posed by 735 school youth aged 12–18 years from Meru and Kajiado Districts. Results show that many questions showed curiosity and anxiousness. …

  3. Changing the picture: youth, gender and HIV/AIDS prevention campaigns in South Africa

    This document points out the apparent connection between gender-based violence and the high incidence of AIDS. Although it is difficult to obtain completely accurate data, there are many cases of pregnancies, STDs and HIV/AIDS in schools and among young women. There is a danger of prevention programme campaigns targeting youth that presuppose an equality between the sexes.

  4. HIV/AIDS and Trauma among learners: Sexual Violence and Deprivation in South Africa

    This article discusses the impact of HIV/AIDS on education in South Africa. South Africa has the fastest growing HIV/AIDS epidemic in the world. In 2001 over 4 million people were already HIV positive, 56% of them women. It is not yet possible to determine rates of HIV infection in schools and other learning institutions - among educators and among learners. The HIV/AIDS projection model commonly used in South Africa suggests that among 15-19 year olds almost 16% of African females are likely to be HIV positive, compared with about 3% of African males. …

Our mission

Supporting education ministries, researchers and practitioners through a comprehensive database, website and information service.