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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Sexual orientation and gender identity and the protection of forced migrants

    Around the world, people face abuse, arbitrary arrest, extortion, violence, severe discrimination and lack of official protection because of their sexual orientation and/or gender identity. This latest issue of FMR includes 26 articles on the abuse of rights of forced migrants who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or intersex. Authors discuss both the challenges faced and examples of good practice in securing protection for LGBTI forced migrants.

  2. The road to safety. Strengthening protection for LGBTI refugees in Uganda and Kenya

    In this report, Human Rights First has provided a comprehensive road map of practical steps that the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the U.S. government, host states, and other key actors should take to protect LGBTI refugees from violence and provide them with equal access to protection and effective durable solutions. This road map will be particularly useful as UNHCR, U.S. agencies, and other actors take steps to implement commitments to address the gaps in protection facing vulnerable LGBTI refugees. …

  3. Realising sexual and reproductive health rights in Kenya: a myth or reality? A report of the Public Inquiry into Violations of Sexual and Reproductive Health Rights in Kenya

    This report presents the findings of the Public Inquiry into violations of sexual and reproductive health rights (SRHR) in Kenya. The Inquiry was undertaken in fulfilment of one of the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights’ (KNCHR) primary mandates- to conduct investigations into any complaint on the violation of human rights in the country. The Inquiry was undertaken by the KNCHR following a complaint filed by two non-governmental organisations (NGOs) working on reproductive health issues in Kenya. …

  4. Vulnerability to HIV and AIDS: A social Research on Cross Border Mobile Population from Bangladesh to India

    This report is focused on the mobility context and its relation to HIV and AIDS. The study tried to explore and discuss context and experiences throughout the mobility continuum including sexual behavior, HIV knowledge, stigma and discrimination, violence, service availability and access. It also tried to unearth the multitude of factors that increase vulnerability among migrants and their families. This report was developed as part of the EMPHASIS project being led by CARE and supported by the Big Lottery Fund, UK.

  5. HIV/AIDS and conflicts: micro evidence from Burundi

    This paper studies the relationship between civil war and HIV/AIDS in Burundi. It contributes to the empirical literature by providing micro level evidence using an identication strategy based on original data on the dynamics of rebel movements. The presence of exit and entry points from and to rebel safe havens is used to generate exogenous variation in con ict intensity. These points are plausibly assumed to serve as starting or end points for rebel attack, but are not directly related to HIV/AIDS or correlated with unobservables. …

  6. Pasa la Voz (Spread the Word): Using Women's Social Networks for HIV Education and Testing

    Pasa la Voz (spread the word) is a methodology used to prevent HIV using respondent-driven sampling to reach hard to access women. An organization in Ciudad Juarez (Programa Companeros) initiated a one-to-one approach to reaching at-risk and hard to reach women in the area using promotoras (outreach workers) from September 2005 to January 2006. The implementation of Pasa la Voz came on its heels and had success in increasing the number of women agreeing to get tested for HIV (11.9% to 49.9%) and decreasing testing time from 22.70 hours to 3.68 hours per test.

  7. HIV/AIDS, security and conflict: making the connections

    The interconnections between conflict and HIV/AIDS are more complex and less obvious than is often thought. HIV/AIDS affects the lives of many: those people caught up in conflict, those who are the protagonists in conflicts, and those whose role it is to provide security during and after conflict. The AIDS, Security and Conflict Initiative (ASCI) undertook research over a number of years to examine the connections, to gather evidence and to advance analysis. …

  8. The Conflict and HIV/AIDS Nexus: An Empirical Assessment

    Within this report, we outline what is generally known about HIV/AIDS and the influence of conflict on the disease. We then discuss the first systematic effort to explore the relationship as well as some limitations with this analysis, prompting the current investigation. Following this, we present our general argument, the data and the research design that we use to explore it. In the next section, we discuss our empirical findings from the global and Rwandan analyses. What do we find? …

  9. Adolescent sexual and reproductive health toolkit for humanitarian settings. A companion to the inter-agency field manual on reproductive health in humanitarian settings

    The Adolescent and Sexual Reproductive Health (ASRH) Toolkit for Humanitarian Settings provides information and guidance to advocate for ASRH and implement adolescent-inclusive SRH interventions. The toolkit is meant to accompany Chapter 4 "Adolescent Reproductive Health" of the Inter-Agency Field Manual on Reproductive Health in humanitarian settings. …

  10. HIV/AIDS, security and conflict: new realities, new responses

    Demonstrating the impact HIV has on security, the ASCI report outlines how security crises and security institutions can influence HIV incidence. Importantly, the study indicates that with good policy and appropriate programmes, challenges can be overcome. It recommends 10 ways in which efforts towards peacekeeping, peacebuilding and humanitarian response can integrate HIV issues.

  11. HIV and emergencies: one size does not fit all

    The dynamics and impact of HIV in humanitarian crises are complex. They depend on the kind of crisis: is it the result of conflict, a rapid-onset natural disaster (such as a flood or cyclone), or a slow-onset emergency caused by drought or environmental degradation? It also depends on the HIV prevalence rate before the crisis, the political situation, the scale and duration of the crisis, the existing infrastructure and services and the level of awareness of HIV. Case studies from five countries facing very different emergencies and HIV prevalence rates were backed by a literature review. …

  12. Development and disasters in a time of HIV and AIDS: an HIV mainstreaming toolkit for development and humanitarian response workers

    This toolkit provides a practical guide to the work of HIV mainstreaming. It has four parts: Part 1 sets out CAFOD's understanding of and commitment to HIV mainstreaming and locates this within its wider response to HIV. Part 2 offers tools and processes for applying HIV mainstreaming to development and humanitarian response programmes. It identifies implications for programme design and implementation (external or programme mainstreaming), and can also indicate some issues arising from this for the internal (organisational) policies and practices of the partner programme. …

  13. HIV and conflict: a double emergency. "Without war, we could fight AIDS"

    In the decade ahead, HIV/AIDS is expected to kill ten times more people than conflict. In conflict situations, children and young people are most at risk from both HIV/AIDS infection and violence. In this report, Save the Children calls on governments, donors and humanitarian agencies to uphold children's rights and to channel resources into preventing what for many young people is already a double emergency.

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