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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. The association between being currently in school and HIV prevalence among young women in nine eastern and southern African countries

    Interventions to keep adolescent girls and young women in school, or support their return to school, are hypothesised to also reduce HIV risk. Such interventions are included in the DREAMS combination package of evidence-based interventions. Although there is evidence of reduced risky sexual behaviours, the impact on HIV incidence is unclear. We used nationally representative surveys to investigate the association between being in school and HIV prevalence.

  2. The effect of a conditional cash transfer on HIV incidence in young women in rural South Africa (HPTN 068): a phase 3, randomised controlled trial

    Cash transfers have been proposed as an intervention to reduce HIV-infection risk for young women in sub-Saharan Africa. However, scarce evidence is available about their effect on reducing HIV acquisition. The authors aimed to assess the effect of a conditional cash transfer on HIV incidence among young women in rural South Africa. Based on their research findings, the authors draw the conclusion that cash transfers conditional on school attendance did not reduce HIV incidence in young women. School attendance significantly reduced risk of HIV acquisition, irrespective of study group. …

  3. The role of partners’ educational attainment in the association between HIV and education amongst women in seven sub-Saharan African countries

    Introduction: Individuals’ educational attainment has long been considered as a risk factor for HIV. However, little attention has been paid to the association between partner educational attainment and HIV infection. Methods: We conducted cross-sectional analysis of young women (aged 1534) in 14 Demographic and Health Surveys from seven sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) countries with generalized HIV epidemics. …

  4. The effect of educational attainment and other factors on HIV risk in South African women: results from antenatal surveillance, 2000-2005

    Objectives: To assess the effect of educational attainment and other factors on the risk of HIV in pregnant South African women. Design: Repeated cross-sectional surveys. Methods: Pregnant women attending public antenatal clinics were tested for HIV annually between 2000 and 2005, and provided demographic information. Logistic regression models were applied separately to the data collected in each year, to identify factors associated with HIV infection. Data from all years were combined in a logistic regression model that tested for trends in HIV prevalence. …

  5. Economic status, education and risky sexual behavior for urban Botswana women

    This study investigated the relationship between economic status, education and risky sexual behavior for urban Botswana women. The data used are a nationally representative sample from the Botswana AIDS Impact Survey conducted in 2004. An un-weighted sample of 2215 women aged 15-49, who have had sexual intercourse was considered for analysis. Both bivariate and multivariate analyses are used to gain insights into the potential linkages between economic status, education and risky sexual behavior. …

  6. Impact of HIV/AIDS education programmes on sexual behaviour of female students in Nigerian schools: Policy implications for scientific and technolgical development

    This study investigated the impact of HIV/AIDS education programmes on sexual behaviors of female students in senior secondary schools in Rivers State of Nigeria. The population for the study comprised of all senior secondary schools female students in Nigeria, which was divided into urban and rural schools. The sample size was 200 female students obtained by using stratified random sampling technique. …

  7. Combat for gender equality in education: rural livelihood pathways in the context of HIV/AIDS

    This book, which was originally written as a dissertation, broadens the approach to gender equality in primary education by exploring the magnitude of complex interactions between schools and rural livelihood household processes in the context of HIV/AIDS. The arguments are based on recent ethnographic research using dimensions of rural pupils', parents', and teachers' responses to the socio-economic impact of HIV/AIDS on their livelihoods. It gives insight into some of the current debates that have been generated in the field of education, HIV/AIDS and rural livelihoods.

  8. Women-centered curriculum: addressing HIV among women and the gender dimensions of HIV in the Middle East and North Africa region

    The purpose of this Women's Workshop Curriculum is to support a truly sustainable HIV response in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Region, centered on positive leadership, women's leadership, prevention, education, and mentorship, as well as gender equity and sensitivity. It is the first curriculum of its kind to be implemented by and for women living with HIV in the MENA Region and thus marks a shift in power from people living with HIV (PLHIV) as beneficiaries, imparters of testimonies, and workshop participants to experts taking a more active role in the response to HIV. …

  9. The HIV/AIDS Epidemic: An Inherent Gender Issue

    A decade ago women seemed to be on the periphery of the epidemic, today they are at the epicentre. In fact, the HIV/AIDS epidemic is taking its toll on everyone, but women are impacted more. This leaflet argues that actions to resolve this issue is not simply a matter of justice or fairness, because gender inequality is fatal. It explains that effects of campaigns are limited, unless women are involved.

  10. Education and HIV and AIDS in Southern Africa. Policy and Programme Action Brief

    Both general education and HIV and AIDS-related education have a role to play in protecting girls from infection. Two recent estimates of the scale of the effect are similar and suggest that each additional year of education leads to a 6.7% (Uganda) or 7% (South Africa) reduction in likelihood of acquiring infection. The protective effects of education may be particularly strong for girls.

  11. The impact of HIV/AIDS on the schooling of female students in Addis Ababa

    In Ethiopia, in 2003, 2.9 million adults and 250 000 children are living with HIV/AIDS. About 90% of the reported AIDS cases are between the age 20 and 49 and this age group is among the productive sector. However, research has revealed (UNESCO Prospect Vol. XXXIII No. 2 June, 2002) that education about sex, AIDS and health in general particularly with children and young people, does not result in increased sexual activity but, on the contrary, leads to protective behaviour. The objectives of this study are as follows: 1. …

  12. Information package on gender and HIV and AIDS

    This package addresses roles, socio-economic issues and cultural norms that are specific to men and women and how they affect or influence the spread of HIV and AIDS. It also looks at the extent to which these issues must be addressed in order to reduce the spread of HIV, and why gender must be mainstreamed in every basic activity in the society. This document is developed for Non Governmental Organisations and Community Based Organizations dealing with HIV and AIDS, advocacy groups, the government, policy and decision-making bodies and the general public. …

  13. Gender and HIV/AIDS: a report of the International Workshop on the Development of Empowering Educational HIV/AIDS Prevention Strategies and Gender Sensitive Materials

    This document is a report of the international workshop on the development of empowering educational HIV/AIDS prevention strategies and gender sensitive materials (not specific for school use), organised in Nairobi, Kenya by the UNESCO Institute for Education in collaboration with the Southern Africa AIDS Information Dissemination Service. …

  14. Regional Workshop on Preventive Education Against HIV/AIDS for Women's Grassroot Organisations in Africa: final report

    This is a report of a workshop for Grassroots Women's Organisation in Africa and was organised in Abidjan from 7-11 September 1998 by UNESCO in co-operation with UNAIDS Regional HIV Development Project. The overall objectives were to reduce the rate of HIV transmission among African women by rendering them capable of protecting themselves through a reinforced awareness, and by giving them appropriate knowledge and skills. This report is written in English and French.

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