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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Do menstrual hygiene management interventions improve education and psychosocial outcomes for women and girls in low and middle income countries? A systematic review

    Background: Unhygienic and ineffective menstrual hygiene management has been documented across low resource contexts and linked to negative consequences for women and girls. Objectives: To summarise and critically appraise evidence for the effectiveness of menstruation management interventions in improving women and girls’ education, work and psychosocial wellbeing in low and middle income countries. [...] Conclusions: There is insufficient evidence to establish the effectiveness of menstruation management interventions, although current results are promising. …

  2. Education and risky sex in Africa: Unraveling the link between women’s education and reproductive health behaviors in Kenya

    Much research attention has been devoted to understanding the relationship between education and riskier sex-related behaviors and HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. While in the early 1990s researchers found that increases in education were associated with a higher incidence of HIV/AIDS, this relationship appears to have reversed and better educated people, especially women, appear less likely to engage in riskier sex-related behaviors and have a lower incidence rate of HIV/AIDS. …

  3. Women, girls and HIV and AIDS: education, women's economic empowerment and workplace violence

    Today, evidence points indisputably to the important intersection of HIV and gender inequality. In 2010, women and girls accounted for more than half of all people living with HIV (about 52%). They are disproportionately affected by gender-based violence, suffer economic inequalities and shoulder the bulk of the burden of caring for people living with HIV.

  4. Women and Men. Together for HIV/AIDS Prevention. Literacy, Gender and HIV/AIDS

    The stereotyping of men and women reinforces unequal sexual practice; a vision of women as weak, innocent, passive and submissive while men are strong, virile, possessive and authoritative is conducive to rape and violence. The role of superstitious beliefs is an important factor; these generally take from women in various ways their right of choice and power of decision over their bodies.The special problems of living with HIV occur in all societies; the responsibility for honesty in sexual relations and proper care of sufferers. …

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