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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. "The nail that sticks out gets hammered down": LGBT bullying and exclusion in Japanese schools

    Based on interviews with more than 50 LGBT students and former students in fourteen prefectures throughout Japan—as well as teachers, officials, and academic experts—this report documents bullying, harassment, and discrimination in Japanese schools based on sexual orientation and gender identity or expression, and the poor record of schools when it comes to appropriately responding to and preventing such incidents.

  2. IDAHO (International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia) in Japan

    IDAHO (International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia) in Japan

  3. Pink Shirt Day 2011 with New Zealand Olympian Blake Skjellerup

    Been bullied at school? It's time to action. Join New Zealand Olympian Blake Skjellerup in writing to Prime Minister John Key to share your stories of bullying, so he can make our schools safer places for everyone - regardless of sexuality, race or gender.

  4. Stand Out: against homophobia in schools

    Stand Out is the work of Australian students who are making a change in their schools, with their information on what you can do to challenge homophobia in yours.

  5. Stand out against homophobia in schools

    Stand Out: Against Homophobia in Schools is a package of resources for students to make an impact on homophobia in schools. It includes a 32 page guide booklet, two new posters, stickers and a video. Stand Out has been created by a team of young people from Minus18 and Safe Schools Coalition Victoria - young people who are determined to stand out and make a change.The word homophobia is used to describe a whole range of irrational negative feelings or behaviour towards anyone who is gay, lesbian, bisexual, or who is attracted to the same sex. …

  6. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth with disabilities: a meta-synthesis

    This meta-synthesis of empirical and nonempirical literature analyzed 24 journal articles and book chapters that addressed the intersection of disability, [homo]sexuality, and gender identity/ expression in P-12 schools, colleges and universities, supported living programs, and other educational and social contexts in Australia, Belgium, Canada, New Zealand, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. …

  7. Teaching diversities: same sex attracted young people, CALD communities, and arts-based community education

    The teaching diversities project has been funded by Victoria University and represents a collaboration with the Centre for Multicultural Youth in recognition of the particular needs (and risks) of doubly-marginalised young people who identify as both same sex-attracted, and those from multicultural backgrounds. The vulnerability of these young people hinges on the intersection of homophobia in some cultural communities and also racism within some lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) communities. …

  8. Writing themselves in 3. The third national study on the sexual health and wellbeing of same sex attracted and gender questioning young people

    Writing Themselves In 3 (WTi3) is the third national study of the sexual health and wellbeing of same sex attracted and gender questioning young people (SSAGQ). The Writing Themselves In reports serve several functions beyond being a strong indicator of the sexual health and wellbeing of SSAGQ young people. They are an indicator of levels of homophobia in Australian schools and other places where young people congregate, and they reveal the effectiveness of the many interventions that aim to make Australia a safer and more inclusive place for these young people. …

  9. Writing themselves in again: 6 years on. The 2nd national report on the sexual health and well-being of same sex attracted young people in Australia

    Writing Themselves In Again - 6 years on: the 2nd national report on the sexuality, health and well-being of same sex attracted young Australians is the follow up report to a similar study conducted in 1998. The aim of the report is to find out whether the many changes in the community have improved the sexual health and well-being of same sex attracted young people (SSAY). In particular the project aimed to: 1. Document the levels of homophobia and discrimination facing SSAY today; 2. Document the impact of homophobia on young people themselves; 3. …

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