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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Let’s step up and deliver!

    This call for action was formulated by the Ministers of Education, Health, Gender, and Youth and senior government officials, gathered in Durban, South Africa, on 18 July 2016 for the Eastern and Southern Africa (ESA) Ministerial Commitment Progress Meeting in order to commit themselves to step up efforts to ensure adolescents’ and young people’s access to good quality CSE and youth-friendly SRH services in the ESA region, and to work in partnership with young people, parents, civil society, and community and religious leaders to achieve the goals set out in the 2013 ESA Commitment.

  2. Affective engagement with research evidence about young people’s sex education in Kenya

    Sex and relationships have a big impact on young people’s lives. For most young people in the world getting information about sexual pleasure, apart from pornography, can be difficult. And it’s even harder if you live in parts of the world where you often aren’t able to decide who to date or marry, or how many children you want to have. For this reason online information on sexuality is hugely popular. Research suggests that young people are arriving at sex education sites mostly through campaigns on social media. …

  3. Eastern and Southern Africa commitment: One year in review - 2013-2014

    In December 2013, ministers of education and health from twenty ESA countries affirmed and endorsed their joint commitment to deliver comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) and sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services for young people. The ESA Commitment document was developed based on a Regional Report, “Young People Today: Time to Act Now” which reviewed the trends and status of sexual and reproductive health and HIV among adolescents and young people in the ESA Region including comprehensive sexuality education and service needs. …

  4. Exploring the opinions of parents and teachers about young people receiving puberty and sex education in rural Kenya: a qualitative study

    In Kenya, one of the most significant public health concerns is the spread of HIV. Additionally, 13,000 girls drop out of school every year due to pregnancy. Although the Kenyan Ministry of Education and other independent organisations have tried to implement various means of developing puberty and sexual health education for young people, the situation is not improving. Aims: To explore the opinions of teachers and parents in rural Kenya about delivering puberty and sex education and to identify their perceptions of barriers to young people accessing this education. …

  5. Love, sexual rights and young people: Learning from our peer educators how to be a youth-centred organisation

    This report examines the findings of an external assessment of the A+ programme, an innovative IPPF youth-led programme funded by Danida. The A+ programme was implemented by IPPF’s Member Associations in 16 countries across Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Central America. Its overriding goal was to increase access to sexual and reproductive health services and comprehensive sexuality education for young people, and to promote their sexual and reproductive health and rights. …

  6. Ministerial Commitment on comprehensive sexuality education and sexual and reproductive health services for adolescents and young people in Eastern and Southern African (ESA)

    On December 7, 2013, ministers and their representatives from 21 countries in Eastern and Southern Africa came together to endorse and adopt the UN commitment for Eastern and Southern Africa with its recommendations for bold action in response to HIV and the education/health challenges experienced by young people. Recognising the urgency of the situation facing young people, education and health ministers have now committed to addressing young people's realities by ramping up sexuality education and health services in their countries.

  7. Choices: a guide for young people.

    Choices is written for young people between the ages of 10 and 24 years; for peer educators and youth leaders; for teachers, health care workers and parents and anyone who is helping young people to grow up as fulfilled and responsible human beings with a sexual and social life. It can be read by young people themselves (where they can try out the activities with their friends and family) or with the supervision of peer educators, teachers and youth leaders to organise learning sessions. …

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