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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. The 2017 National School Climate Survey: the experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer youth in our nation’s schools

    The full GLSEN 2017 National School Climate Survey report includes information on LGBTQ middle and high school students' experiences, including: hearing biased language, from both students and educators; experiences of harassment and assault; anti-LGBTQ discrimination; effects of a hostile school climate on educational outcomes and psychological well-being; and the availability and utility of supportive school resources. This report also examines demographic and school differences in students’ experiences, as well as changes in school climate over time. …

  2. From teasing to torment: school climate revisited a survey of U.S. secondary school students and teachers

    This document provides an in-depth look at the current landscape of bias and peer victimization as reported by students and teachers from across the nation. In addition to examining various types of bias, including those based on race/ethnicity, religion, body size, and ability, this report provides a focused look at LGBTQ issues in secondary schools. Comparing findings to a similar survey conducted in 2005, the report discusses the progress that has been made over the past ten years, as well as highlights the challenges that remain. …

  3. Why LGBT issues matter in education

    The author analyzes how three dimensions of the school system: school climate, formal curriculum and teaching practices influence the school experiences of LGBT youth. Rendering schooling more inclusive and less discriminatory implies understanding and taking action on each of these dimensions. The arguments are organized in three angles : Angle 1. The truth about homophobia and gender-based violence in education; Angle 2. LGBT-inclusive education; Angle 3. Teachers dealing with sexual diversity.

  4. From statehouse to schoolhouse: Anti-bullying policy efforts in U.S. states and school districts

    From Statehouse to Schoolhouse: Anti-Bullying Policy Efforts in U.S. States and School Districts fills an important gap in our understanding by examining: The prevalence of anti-bullying policies in all U.S. …

  5. Invited commentary: Broadening the evidence for adolescent sexual and reproductive health and education in the United States

    Scientific research has made major contributions to adolescent health by providing insights into factors that influence it and by defining ways to improve it. However, US adolescent sexual and reproductive health policies-particularly sexuality health education policies and programs-have not benefited from the full scope of scientific understanding. From 1998 to 2009, federal funding for sexuality education focused almost exclusively on ineffective and scientifically inaccurate abstinence-only-until-marriage (AOUM) programs. …

  6. The 2013 National School Climate Survey. The experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth in our nation’s schools

    The 2013 National School Climate Survey is GLSEN's 8th biennial report on the school experiences of LGBT youth in schools, including the in-school resources that support LGBT students’ well-being, the extent of the challenges that they face at school, and insights into many other aspects of LGBT students’ experiences.

  7. Gender nonconforming youth: Discipline disparities, school push-out, and the school-to-prison pipeline

    The school-to-prison pipeline, or STPP, refers to a set of school policies and practices that push students away from education and onto a pathway toward the juvenile detention and the prison industrial complex. School policies and practices that promote the STPP include “zero tolerance” policies, increased police presence, suspension and expulsion, and harsh and disparate disciplinary practices. Research has demonstrated that students pushed out by such policies, practices, and disciplinary disparities are disproportionally students of color and low-income students. …

  8. The 2011 National School Climate Survey: the experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth in our nation’s schools

    In this 2011 survey, the authors examine the experiences of LGBT students with regard to indicators of negative school climate: hearing biased remarks, including homophobic remarks, in school; feeling unsafe in school because of personal characteristics, such as sexual orientation, gender expression, or race/ethnicity; missing classes or days of school because of safety reasons; and experiencing harassment and assault in school. …

  9. Going beyond gay-straight alliances to make schools safe for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students

    Currently, the establishment of Gay-Straight Alliances (GSA) in schools is one of the most visible and widely adopted strategies for calling attention to and addressing the needs of LGBT students. …

  10. Working with transgender children and their classmates in pre-adolescence: Just be supportive

    This study documents a school district’s coordinated response to an elementary student’s social transition from a gender variant boy to a female gender expression. Data were gathered through analysis of journal entries, lesson plans, and interviews with the child, guardian, and district personnel. Stakeholders reported a favorable outlook on the transition, particularly in the areas of classroom and school interventions, peer involvement, and maintaining safety for all. The greatest concerns related to communication and language. …

  11. Gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths' perception of their high school environments and comfort in school

    This study investigated gay, lesbian, and bisexual adolescents' perceptions of their school environment, their experiences with victimization and professional support in school, and individual, peer, and family factors associated with their perceptions of and comfort in their school environments. Data were gathered from 136 self-identified gay, lesbian, and bisexual high school students in northern New England. …

  12. Responding to harassment of LGBT youth in schools: snapshots from three trend-setting countries

    This report explores three countries’ responses to one aspect of LGBT marginalization—school harassment of LGBT youth. In particular, the authors studied the policies and programs of the United States, Germany and Brazil in an effort to identify lessons learned that could help ameliorate school harassment of LGBT youth and create the beginnings of a 3Rs movement to end homophobia and transphobia and the negative impact they have on young people. These countries where selected as snapshots of important, trend-setting work being done in different regions of the world. …

  13. Bullying of lesbian and gay youth: a qualitative investigation

    The preponderance of bullying research does not address sexual orientation as a possible factor. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of service providers and youth advocates working with lesbian and gay communities in order to increase understanding of bullying of lesbian and gay youth. In depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine key informants from various education and social service settings. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Inductive data analysis was conducted using a constant comparative method. …

  14. High school gay-straight alliances (GSAs) and young adult well-being: an examination of GSA presence, participation, and perceived effectiveness

    Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) are student-led, school-based clubs that aim to provide a safe environment in the school context for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students, as well as their straight allies. The present study examines the potential for GSAs to support positive youth development and to reduce associations among LGBT-specific school victimization and negative young adult well-being. …

  15. Overlooked and at Risk: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Youth in the Caribbean

    As long as criminalization of homosexuality and stigma, discrimination and violence against LGBT individuals continues in the Caribbean, the emotional and physical health of LGBT young people is at risk. All young people have the right to be treated equally under the law and to live free of discrimination and harassment. Organizations, governments, and individuals must work toward full acceptance and recognition of LGBT people, including young people.

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