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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Establishing an association between rural youth suicide and same-sex attraction

    Recent research into same-sex attracted youth (SSAY) suicide and rural youth suicide suggests there may be an association between the two. A literature review explores this proposal. While contributing issues to rural SSAY suicide, such as homophobia, isolation, avaibility of information, and acknowledgement of issues are discussed, little hard evidence is found to support the rural and SSAY suicide connection. Further and on-going research is recommended into this under-represented topic.

  2. Social policy report: safe schools policy for LGBTQ students

    Two proposed U.S. federal laws would provide explicit protection for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning (LGBTQ) students in public schools. These federal laws follow actions by many states and school districts to define and implement laws or policies to protect the safety of LGBTQ students in schools. Research during the past decade has shown that LGBTQ youth are a vulnerable population, and that the negative school experiences of LGBTQ students often contribute to their vulnerability. …

  3. Unseen on screen: gay people on youth TV

    TV remains the medium used by most of Britain's young people despite the predictions of its demise in an age of social media. Still watched by millions, it's helping shape shared social attitudes for decades to come. That's why Stonewall wanted to investigate the portrayal of gay people on TV. …

  4. Transgendered children in schools: a critical review of homophobic bullying: safe to learn, embedding anti-bullying work in schools

    The author argues that the interests of transgendered children are being ignored by the Department for Children, Schools and Families [UK] and that the publication of guidance on homophobic bullying only serves to highlight deficiencies in the way these children are excluded within the education system.

  5. A national study of LGBT educators' perceptions of their workplace climate

    This research provides important information on how to create climates where all educators feel safe, protected and valued within their schools. Ultimately, students will not excel to their full potential if all of their teachers do not feel safe and fully supported by their workplace environments. LGBT educators need then to work in as supportive a school climate as heterosexual educators. It is suspected they do not, but little quantitative evidence exists in the literature to know whether this is true. This study sought to fill this gap.

  6. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth with disabilities: a meta-synthesis

    This meta-synthesis of empirical and nonempirical literature analyzed 24 journal articles and book chapters that addressed the intersection of disability, [homo]sexuality, and gender identity/ expression in P-12 schools, colleges and universities, supported living programs, and other educational and social contexts in Australia, Belgium, Canada, New Zealand, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. …

  7. Who, what, where, when, and why: demographic and ecological factors contributing to hostile school climate for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth

    This study examines how locational (region and local), community-level (school district poverty and adult educational attainment), and school district-level (district size and ratios of students to key school personnel) variables are related to indicators of hostile school climate for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. Indicators of hostile climate included frequency of homophobic remarks and victimization regarding sexual orientation and gender expression. …

  8. Teaching diversities: same sex attracted young people, CALD communities, and arts-based community education

    The teaching diversities project has been funded by Victoria University and represents a collaboration with the Centre for Multicultural Youth in recognition of the particular needs (and risks) of doubly-marginalised young people who identify as both same sex-attracted, and those from multicultural backgrounds. The vulnerability of these young people hinges on the intersection of homophobia in some cultural communities and also racism within some lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) communities. …

  9. Transgender children and youth: a child welfare practice perspective

    Using an ecological framework, the existing literature and research, and the authors' combined 60 years of clinical practice with children, youth, and families, this article examines gender variant childhood development from a holistic viewpoint where children, youth, and environments are understood as a unit in the context of their relationship to one another. …

  10. School-based lives of LGBT Youth in the Republic of Ireland

    There is a dearth of research on the experience of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth in schools in the Republic of Ireland. The current study assessed the school-based experiences of twenty five (N = 25) participants in the BeLonG To LGBT youth group in Dublin city using a mixed design survey instrument. …

  11. Stonewall education equality index 2011: preventing and tackling homophobic bullying in Britain's schools

    Invitations were extended to the 149 English local authorities and the 32 Scottish local authorities to participate in Stonewall's first Education Equality Index on preventing and tackling homophobic bullying in Britain's schools. 35 leading local authorities from across England and Scotland entered, making it a highly competitive benchmarking exercise. Together they cover over 6,000 primary, secondary and special schools. …

  12. Principal's perspective: school safety, bullying and harassment. A survey of public school principals

    The report from this study, The Principal's Perspective: School Safety, Bullying and Harassment, reveals a rich and complex picture of the attitudes of principals. Half of principals surveyed deem bullying, name-calling or harassment of students to be a serious problem at their school. Only one-third of secondary school principals say that a lesbian, gay or bisexual student would feel very safe at their school and only one-quarter say that a transgender student would feel very safe. …

  13. Conversations in equity and social justice: constructing safe schools for queer youth

    The paper is a critique of discourse focused on at-risk behaviour and homophobic bullying. The paper argues that conversations around homophobic bullying must include discussions of doing equity and achieving social justice, in which the ultimate goal of constructing safe schools is achieved through the utter transformation of school culture. Failure to do anything less continues to license homophobia and makes predictable and inevitable violence against queer youth. …

  14. Youth speak up about homophobia and transphobia: the first national climate survey on homophobia in Canadian schools

    Educators and researchers have long been aware that students experience homophobic incidents ranging from hearing "gay" used as a synonym for "stupid" or "worthless", to being insulted or assaulted because of their actual or perceived sexual or transgender identity. This report discusses the results of a national survey of Canadian high school students undertaken in order to identify the forms and extent of their experiences of homophobic and transphobic incidents at school and the efficacy of measures being taken by schools to combat these common form of bullying.

  15. Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth talk about experiencing and coping with school violence: a qualitative study

    This qualitative study used five focus groups of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth attending public high schools to examine their experiences with school violence. Core themes focused on lack of community and empowerment leading to youth being without a sense of human agency in school. Negative attention themes were indicative of the vulnerability that the youth felt at school. As principal means of coping, the LGBT youth escaped and avoided stressors by distancing themselves from school. …

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