• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 8 results in 0.029 seconds.

Search results

  1. Deadly Delay: South Africa's Efforts to Prevent HIV in Survivors of Sexual Violence

    This 73-page report documents how government inaction and misinformation from high-level officials have undermined the effectiveness of South Africa’s program to provide rape survivors with post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) — antiretroviral drugs that can reduce the risk of contracting HIV from an HIV-positive attacker.

  2. Silenced and forgotten: HIV and AIDS agenda setting paper for women living with HIV, sex workers and LGBT individuals in southern African and Indian Ocean states

    The impact of the HIV and AIDS epidemic is felt hardest by the individuals who are infected or affected by the disease, and in particular by individuals who are especially vulnerable to HIV infection due to stigma and discrimination, poverty, a lack of access to education, health and other services that promote HIV awareness. However, the impact of HIV and AIDS goes beyond the individual or household level – it affects nations as a whole. …

  3. Sexuality and the limits of agency among South African teenage women: theorising femininities and their connections to HIV risk practices

    In South Africa, both HIV and gender-based violence are highly prevalent. Gender inequalities give men considerable relational power over young women, particularly in circumstances of poverty and where sex is materially rewarded. Young women are often described as victims of men, but this inadequately explains women's observed sexual agency. This paper takes a different approach. The authors use qualitative interviews and ethnographic observation among 16 young women from the rural Eastern Cape to explore ways young women construct their femininities and exercise agency. …

  4. Keep them in school: the importance of education as a protective factor against HIV infection among young South African women

    This study aimed to identify risk factors for HIV infection among women aged 15-24 years who reported having one lifetime sexual partner in South Africa. A 2003 household survey of 11,904 15-24 year old women on sexual behavior and HIV testing was used. The analysis focuses on a sample of 1,708 women reporting one lifetime partner. Results show that 15% of the women reporting one lifetime partner were HIV positive. In multivariable analysis, completion of high school was associated withábeing HIV-negative (AOR 3.75; 95% CI 1.34-10.46). …

  5. Reducing HIV Infection in Young Women in Southern Africa: The Key to Altering Epidemic Trajectories in a Generalized, Hyperendemic Setting

    This paper gives an overview of the HIV prevention battle in Southern Africa and supports the development of more balanced and innovative HIV prevention portfolio that adresses the real, immediate, and substantial risk facing young women from sub-Saharan African countries.

  6. Gender equality, HIV, and AIDS: a challenge for the education sector

    The book shows that while gender inequalities in society generally, and particularly within the education sector, are driving aspects of the HIV epidemic, educational settings can be empowering and bring about change. It examines different expectations of what HIV education programmes and education settings can do to transform unequal gender relations and protect young people against HIV and AIDS and contribute to care for those affected and infected. …

  7. Scaling up for zero tolerance: civil society leadership in eliminating violence against women and girls in Ghana, Rwanda, and South Africa

    Based on the Global AIDS Alliance's August 2006 report Zero Tolerance: Stop the Violence Against Women and Children, Stop HIV/AIDS, this report explores successes and challenges of scaling up comprehensive national programs to prevent, respond to, and mitigate the impacts of violence against women and girls (VAW/G) and violence against children (VAC). The countries selected for the study - Ghana, Rwanda, and South Africa - demonstrate concerted efforts to address the problem. …

  8. Zero tolerance: stop the violence against women and children, stop HIV/AIDS

    This document describes a framework for a comprehensive response to violence against women and children, including the resources that would be needed, political and financial, for full implementation. It suggests taking into account the following pillars: 1. Political commitment and resource mobilization, 2. Legal and judicial reform, 3. Health sector reform, 4. Education sector reform, 5. Community mobilization for zero tolerance, 6. Mass marketing for social change.

Our mission

Supporting education ministries, researchers and practitioners through a comprehensive database, website and information service.