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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Experimental evaluation of school-based HIV programs in sub-Saharan Africa

    School-based adolescent health education programs represent a durable strategy in reducing the spread of HIV because they can leverage pre-existing social and organizational structures to reach large fractions of students at critical life stages. Many evaluations of school-based HIV programs draw on multilevel study designs that assign schools to treatment conditions or assign students to treatment conditions within blocks defined by school membership. …

  2. Effect of a cash transfer programme for schooling on prevalence of HIV and herpes simplex type 2 in Malawi: a cluster randomised trial

    Lack of education and an economic dependence on men are often suggested as important risk factors for HIV infection in women. The authors assessed the efficacy of a cash transfer programme for schooling to reduce the risk of sexually transmitted infections in young women. Based on their findings the authors conclude that cash transfer programmes can reduce HIV and HSV-2 infections in adolescent schoolgirls in low-income settings. Structural interventions that do not directly target sexual behaviour change can be important components of HIV prevention strategies.

  3. Factors associated with HIV infection among educated Malawians: analysis of the 2010 demographic and health survey

    Introduction: Among people who have ever attended school, higher educational attainment appears to be associated with higher prevalence of HIV. This study assesses the association between education and HIV status in Malawi, among individuals with some education, after adjusting for various background characteristics.

  4. The role of partners’ educational attainment in the association between HIV and education amongst women in seven sub-Saharan African countries

    Introduction: Individuals’ educational attainment has long been considered as a risk factor for HIV. However, little attention has been paid to the association between partner educational attainment and HIV infection. Methods: We conducted cross-sectional analysis of young women (aged 1534) in 14 Demographic and Health Surveys from seven sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) countries with generalized HIV epidemics. …

  5. Engaging school personnel in making schools safe for girls in Botswana, Malawi, and Mozambique

    Girls are vulnerable to HIV in part because the social systems in which they live have failed to protect them. This study evaluates a program aimed at making schools safe for girl learners in order to reduce girls’ vulnerability to HIV in Botswana, Malawi, and Mozambique. In addition to an extensive process evaluation with school personnel program participants, program facilitators, and community members, a cross-sectional post-intervention survey was conducted among adolescent girls in the three countries. The total sample size was 1249 adolescent girls (ages 11–18). …

  6. Life skills education and reproductive health education: preliminary findings from the non-biomedical interventions into HIV and AIDS study

    According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), life skills are defined as the abilities for adaptive and positive behaviours that enable individuals to effectively deal with demands and challenges of everyday life (WHO, 1993). Life Skills Education (LSE) and Sexual Reproductive Health Education have been introduced in Malawi's schools by the Ministry of Education as an integrated initiative. …

  7. Orphans and vulnerable children: Trends in school access and experience in Eastern and Southern Africa

    Across sub-Saharan Africa, the AIDS pandemic has impacted children in a myriad of ways, from parental loss, to HIV infection, to increased poverty and marginalization. These children have been labeled orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) in the international development literature, and a range of interventions have provided services aiming to mitigate the impact of the crisis on human development outcomes, including education. …

  8. Trends in HIV prevalence and sexual behaviour among young people aged 15-24 years in countries most affected by HIV

    Objectives: In 2001 the United Nations (UN) Declaration of Commitment was signed by 189 countries with a goal to reduce HIV prevalence among young people by 25% by 2010. Progress towards this target is assessed. In addition, changes in reported sexual behaviour among young people aged 15e24 years are investigated. Methods: Thirty countries most affected by HIV were invited to participate in the study. Trends in HIV prevalence among young antenatal clinic (ANC) attendees were analysed using data from sites that were consistently included in surveillance between 2000 and 2008. …

  9. Are there any disparities between girls and boys in the response of the education sector to HIV and AIDS? Assessment of educational HIV/AIDS prevention programmes applied by SACMEQ III countries

    This paper aims to assess whether the goals of the in-school programmes on prevention of HIV and AIDS that are taught in primary schools of 15 national ministries of education in Southern and Eastern Africa have been reached equitably between boys and girls by the end of primary education. One feature of most of these ministries is that they are in countries that are the hardest hit by a general HIV epidemic. More specifically, the paper aims to analyse schoolboys’ and schoolgirls’ general knowledge about HIV and AIDS. …

  10. Strengthening contemporary school health, nutrition and HIV prevention programmes. Report of the 8th Annual Africa Short Course

    In June 2012, the Partnership for Child Development (PCD), Imperial College London, in partnership with the Eastern and Southern African Centre for International Parasite Control (ESACIPAC) and West African Centre for International Parasite Control (WACIPAC), delivered the 8th Annual Short Course on Strengthening Contemporary School Health, Nutrition and HIV Prevention Programmes at the Sun ’n’ Sand Beach Resort in Kilifi, Kenya. …

  11. Children’s school participation and HIV/AIDS in rural Malawi: the role of parental knowledge and perceptions

    Studies of the relationship between HIV/AIDS and children’s educational attainment largely focus on the direct impacts of parental illness and death, overlooking the potential indirect impact that parental knowledge and perceptions of their HIV status may have on children’s school enrollment. Drawing on both quantitative and qualitative evidence from Malawi, this paper finds that women’s real and perceived anticipation of future health shocks has a positive impact on their children’s educational attainment. …

  12. Teacher peer counseling on HIV/AIDS successes and lessons learned from Mangochi District, Malawi, September 2008

    More than forty percent of teacher deaths in Malawi are related to HIV/AIDS, making AIDS-related death the most common cause of teacher attrition. In Malawi's Mangochi District, an average of three teachers die every month due to illness related to HIV/AIDS, with 52 teachers - 4.3 percent of the teaching corps - dying between June 2006 and August 2008.2 To respond to this crisis, Save the Children initiated an HIV/AIDS peer counseling program for teachers. A needs assessment showed that teachers, like others, rarely go for testing and generally lack access to anti-retroviral medications. …

  13. Scaling up and sustaining community-based care for preschool and schoolage children - successes and challenges in Malawi

    Community-based organizations (CBOs) are an important model for the care of orphans and other vulnerable children whose life and development are threatened by human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and poverty. However, data are lacking on the challenges and solutions enabling successful expansion of these programs to the national level. This article presents some of the experiences encountered by Malawi in the expansion of their network of CBOs. …

  14. Malawi and the fight against HIV/AIDS

    Despite the potentially extremely serious impacts of HIV/AIDS on education in Malawi, very little attention had been devoted to this fundamentally important problem. No robust research had been undertaken that systematically analyses all key quantitative and qualitative impacts of the epidemics on education. The study focused on three key questions: A) How has the HIV/AIDS epidemic affected primary and secondary schooling? B) What would be the likely impacts of the epidemic on education provision during the next 10-15 years? C) What should be done to mitigate these impacts?

  15. Pupil and teacher knowledge about HIV and AIDS in Malawi

    The Southern and Eastern Africa Consortium for Monitoring Educational Quality (SACMEQ) is a network of 15 Ministries of Education: Botswana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania (Mainland), Tanzania (Zanzibar), Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. …

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